Collins, William


Collins, William

▪ English poet
born Dec. 25, 1721, Chichester, Sussex, Eng.
died June 12, 1759, Chichester

      pre-Romantic English poet whose lyrical odes adhered to Neoclassical forms but were Romantic in theme and feeling. Though his literary career was brief and his output slender, he is considered one of the finest English lyric poets of the 18th century.

      He was educated at Winchester College, where he formed one of the most stable and fruitful relationships of his unstable life: his friendship with the poet and critic Joseph Warton. When only 17, under the influence of Pope's Pastorals, he composed his four Persian Eclogues (1742; 2nd ed., Oriental Eclogues, 1757), the only one of his works to be esteemed in his lifetime. In 1744 he published his verse Epistle: Addrest to Sir Thomas Hanmer on his Edition of Shakespeare's Works, containing his exquisite “Dirge from Cymbeline.”

      Collins graduated from Magdalen College, Oxford (1743), and went to London in 1744. An inheritance, supplemented by an allowance from his uncle, enabled him to live as a man-about-town. He made friends with Dr. Johnson, who expressed respect for his talents and, later, concern for his fate. By 1746 extravagance and dissipation had put Collins deeply in debt. He agreed to collaborate with Warton on a volume of odes. The two men's poems eventually appeared separately that December (the title page of Collins' Odes being dated 1747). Warton's collection was well received, but Collins' Odes on Several Descriptive and Allegorical Subjects was barely noticed. Though disappointed, Collins continued to perfect the style exemplified in his “Ode to Simplicity.”

      In 1749 Collins' uncle died, leaving him enough money to extricate himself from debt. In the next few months he wrote his “Ode on the Popular Superstitions of the Highlands of Scotland,” which anticipates many of the attitudes and interests of the Romantic poets. Threatened after 1751 by mental illness and physical debility, which he tried to cure by travel, Collins was confined in a mental asylum in 1754. Released to the care of his sister, he survived wretchedly in Chichester for five more years, neglected and forgotten by his literary friends, who believed him dead. His work, however, became influential and admired after his death.

      The standard edition of his poems, The Poems of Thomas Gray, William Collins, Oliver Goldsmith (1976), was edited by Roger Lonsdale.

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  • Collins, William — (1721 1759)    A pre Romantic poet of many odes, the son of a hatter from Chichester, Sussex, Collins was educated at Winchester College and Magdalen College, Oxford, where he published his Persian Eclogues (1742). Dr. Samuel Johnson says of him …   British and Irish poets

  • Collins, William — ► (1721 59) Poeta británico. Obras: Églogas persas, y Odas, sobre diversos temas alegóricos y subjetivos …   Enciclopedia Universal

  • COLLINS, WILLIAM —    1) a gifted and ill fated English poet, born at Chichester; settled in London; fell into dissipated habits and straitened circumstances; had £2000 left him by an uncle, but both health and spirits were broken, and he died in mental imbecility; …   The Nuttall Encyclopaedia

  • Collins, William — (1721 1759)    Poet, s. of a respectable hatter at Chichester, where he was b. He was ed. at Chichester, Winchester, and Oxf. His is a melancholy career. Disappointed with the reception of his poems, especially his Odes, he sank into despondency …   Short biographical dictionary of English literature

  • Collins, (William)Wilkie — Collins, (William) Wilkie. 1824 1889. British writer noted for his pioneering detective novels, including The Woman in White (1860) and The Moonstone (1868). * * * …   Universalium

  • Collins, (William) Wilkie — (8 ene. 1824, Londres, Inglaterra–23 sep. 1889, Londres). Novelista inglés. Tras incursionar brevemente en el ámbito legal y comercial, se dedicó a la literatura y cultivó una relación de amistad con Charles Dickens, quien ejerció una influencia… …   Enciclopedia Universal

  • Collins, William Wilkie — (1824 1889)    Novelist, s. of William C., R.A., entered Lincoln s Inn, and was called to the Bar 1851, but soon relinquished law for literature. His first novel was Antonina (1850), a historical romance. He found his true field, however, in the… …   Short biographical dictionary of English literature

  • Collins, (William) Wilkie — born Jan. 8, 1824, London, Eng. died Sept. 23, 1889, London English novelist. After working briefly in commerce and law, he took up writing and became associated with Charles Dickens, who had a formative influence on his career. For two works, he …   Universalium

  • Collins, William Wilkie — ► (1824 89) Novelista británico, amigo y colaborador de Dickens, creador del género de misterio con Sin nombre (1862) y La piedra lunar (1868) …   Enciclopedia Universal

  • William Collins — may refer to: William Collins (bishop) (1867–1911), Bishop of Gibraltar in the Church of England William Collins (poet) (1721–1759), English poet William Collins (painter) (1788–1847), English landscape artist William Collins (publisher)… …   Wikipedia