carbonaceous chondrite


carbonaceous chondrite

 a diverse class of chondrites (one of the two divisions of stony meteorites), important because of the insights they provide into the early history of the solar system. They comprise about 3 percent of all meteorites collected after being seen to fall to Earth. Carbonaceous chondrites are subdivided into six well-established groups—CI, CM, CV, CO, CR, and CK—based on their bulk chemistry, petrology, and oxygen isotopic compositions. Two additional groups, named CH and CB, has also been tentatively identified. Like all chondrites, carbonaceous chondrites (with the exception of the CI group) are composed principally of chondrules and refractory inclusions set in a fine-grained matrix.

      The name carbonaceous is something of a misnomer. This class of chondrites originally was assumed to be rich in carbonaceous material because of the gray-to-black appearance of many of its members. Although some carbonaceous chondrites contain up to 2 percent carbon by weight in organic matter, others contain less carbonaceous material than some members of other classes of chondrite. The dark appearance has more to do with the greater abundance of fine-grained matrix in them than in most chondrites. Like other chondrites, carbonaceous chondrites have experienced various degrees of aqueous alteration, thermal metamorphism, or a combination of the two. Aqueous alteration of the group known as CI chondrites was so extensive that few if any of their original features have survived. CI chondrites do not show even vestiges of chondrules. Since chondrules are considered the defining feature of chondrites, it could be argued that they are not chondrites at all; nevertheless, based on their chemistry and other features, it makes sense to group them with the chondrites.

      Carbonaceous chondrites are arguably the most important class of meteorite for three reasons. First, members of the CI group have the most primitive bulk compositions of any chondrite—i.e., their nonvolatile element compositions are very similar to that of the Sun. Second, refractory inclusions, which are the oldest objects known to have formed in the solar system, are most abundant in carbonaceous chondrites, particularly the CV group. Finally, the abundances in the CI and CM chondrites of material that predates the solar system are the highest of any chondrites. This presolar material is contained in the matrices of chondrites, and the CI and CM chondrites are richest in matrix. In addition, whereas presolar material is destroyed by thermal metamorphism, no CI chondrites and few CM chondrites have experienced significant metamorphism. The presolar material includes refractory circumstellar grains, which formed around stars at or near the end of their lives (such as supernovas and asymptotic giant branch stars), and organic matter, at least some of which formed in molecular clouds in the interstellar medium. The organic matter is present as an insoluble macromolecular material, something like terrestrial kerogen, and a less abundant soluble fraction. At least some of the soluble fraction probably formed by hydrolysis (a chemical breakdown reaction involving addition of the elements of water) of the macromolecular material during aqueous alteration. The soluble fraction is a complex mixture of compounds, but perhaps its most notable (but not the most abundant) components are amino acids and nucleic acids, both of which are fundamental to life on Earth. Similar organic matter would have been raining down on the early Earth in comets, meteorites, and micrometeorites, but at present it is not known if this influx from space played any role in the evolution of life.

Conel M.O'D. Alexander
 

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Universalium. 2010.

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