Bath, William Pulteney, 1st Earl of, Viscount Pulteney Of Wrington, Baron Of Hedon


Bath, William Pulteney, 1st Earl of, Viscount Pulteney Of Wrington, Baron Of Hedon

▪ British politician
born March 22, 1684, London, England
died July 7, 1764, London

      English Whig politician who became prominent in the opposition to Sir Robert Walpole (first lord of the treasury and chancellor of the Exchequer, 1721–42), after being staunchly loyal to him for 12 years, up to 1717. Pulteney was himself three times in a position to form a government but failed to do so. A scholarly and versatile man and a brilliantly satirical orator, he conspicuously lacked the true statesman's willingness to assume responsibility.

      A member of the House of Commons from 1705 to 1742 (when he was created an earl), Pulteney served as secretary at war (1714–17) in the first ministry in the reign of George I. When Walpole came to power in 1721, Pulteney was not given high office, and his subsequent failure (1724) to obtain the secretaryship of state greatly embittered him and prompted him to charge Walpole with corruption. As a leader of the anti-Walpole Whigs, he joined the 1st Viscount Bolingbroke in trying to form a united party of opposition and in publishing a political newspaper, The Craftsman (1726–36). Pulteney's journalism and brilliant parliamentary speeches encouraged the Whig and Tory factions that were opposed to Walpole to form an alliance, and he was considered in large part responsible for Walpole's inability to enact a wine and tobacco excise bill in 1733.

      Pulteney's career lost its momentum in 1735, when Bolingbroke retired from politics and the Whig-Tory combination against Walpole disintegrated. When Walpole fell from power in 1742, Pulteney declined two requests by King George II to form a government, accepting instead the first lordship of the treasury in the 1st Earl of Wilmington's ministry (1742–43) and the earldom of Bath, thus alienating many of his supporters. He left office when Wilmington died (July 2, 1743), and Henry Pelham, an old enemy of Bath, became prime minister. In 1746 Bath and John Carteret, Earl Granville, attempted to organize a government; their failure terminated Bath's political life.

* * *


Universalium. 2010.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • William Pulteney, 1st Earl of Bath — William Pulteney, 1st Earl of Bath, PC (22 March 1684 ndash; July 7, 1764) was an English politician, dubbed the first Earl of Bath in 1742 by King George II; he is sometimes stated to have been Prime Minister, for the shortest term ever (two… …   Wikipedia

  • Walpole, Robert, 1st earl of Orford — born Aug. 26, 1676, Houghton Hall, Norfolk, Eng. died March 18, 1745, London English statesman generally regarded as the first British prime minister. Elected to the House of Commons in 1701, he became an active Whig parliamentarian. He served as …   Universalium

  • Pitt, William, the Elder — later 1st earl of Chatham born Nov. 15, 1708, London, Eng. died May 11, 1778, Hayes, Kent British statesman and orator, twice virtual prime minister (1756–61, 1766–68). He entered Parliament in 1735 and provoked controversy with his maiden speech …   Universalium

  • United Kingdom — a kingdom in NW Europe, consisting of Great Britain and Northern Ireland: formerly comprising Great Britain and Ireland 1801 1922. 58,610,182; 94,242 sq. mi. (244,100 sq. km). Cap.: London. Abbr.: U.K. Official name, United Kingdom of Great… …   Universalium