atmospheric science


atmospheric science

 interdisciplinary field of study that combines the components of physics and chemistry that focus on the structure and dynamics of Earth's atmosphere. Mathematical tools, such as differential equations (differential equation) and vector analysis, and computer systems are used to evaluate the physical and chemical relations that describe the workings of the atmosphere.

      The atmospheric sciences are traditionally divided into three topical areas—meteorology (weather forecasting) (the study and forecasting (weather forecasting) of weather), climatology (the study of long-term atmospheric patterns and their influences), and aeronomy (the study of the physics and chemistry of the upper atmosphere). In meteorology, the focus of study concerns day-to-day and hour-to-hour changes in weather within the lower stratosphere and troposphere. Climatology, on the other hand, concentrates more on longer time periods ranging from a single month to millions of years and attempts to describe the interaction of the atmosphere with the oceans, lakes, land, and glaciers. For example, of the three topical areas, climatology would be the best equipped to provide a farmer with the most likely date of the first frost in the autumn. The focus of aeronomy is on the atmosphere from the stratosphere outward. This field also considers the role the atmosphere plays in the propagation of electromagnetic communications, such as shortwave radio transmissions.

      Within these three major topical areas, the broad nature of the atmospheric sciences has spawned practitioners who specialize in several distinct subfields. Scientists who investigate the physics associated with atmospheric flow are called dynamic meteorologists or simply dynamicists. When the investigation procedure involves the application of large computer models (mathematical model) of atmospheric structure and dynamics, the scientists are called numerical modelers. Scientists and technicians who specifically investigate procedures of weather forecasting are called synoptic meteorologists, while those who investigate the physical mechanisms associated with the growth of cloud droplets and ice crystals and related precipitation processes are called cloud physicists. Researchers who study atmospheric optical effects are referred to as physical meteorologists, while individuals who investigate the dynamics and observations of climate are called climatologists or climate scientists. Paleoclimatologists are researchers who concentrate on ancient climate patterns. Scientists who investigate atmospheric structure and dynamics within the boundary layer (the layer of the atmosphere closest to Earth's surface) are referred to as boundary layer meteorologists or micrometeorologists.

Roger A. Pielke, Sr.

Additional Reading
The different subdisciplines of atmospheric sciences are discussed in John M. Wallace and Peter V. Hobbs, Atmospheric Science: An Introductory Survey, 2nd ed. (2006); Roger A. Pielke, Jr., and Roger A. Pielke, Sr. (eds.), Storms, 2 vol. (2000); Dennis J. Parker (ed.), Floods, 2 vol. (2000); R.M. Rauber, J.E. Walsh, and D.J. Charlevoix, Severe and Hazardous Weather (2002); R.P. Pearce (ed.), Meteorology at the Millennium (2002), vol. 83 of the International Geophysics Series; and Stanley D. Gedzelman, The Science and Wonders of the Atmosphere (1980).Roger A. Pielke, Sr.

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Universalium. 2010.

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