Arrhenius theory


Arrhenius theory

      theory, introduced in 1887 by the Swedish scientist Svante Arrhenius (Arrhenius, Svante August), that acids (acid) are substances that dissociate in water to yield electrically charged atoms or molecules, called ions (ion), one of which is a hydrogen ion (H+), and that bases (base) ionize in water to yield hydroxide ions (OH). It is now known that the hydrogen ion cannot exist alone in water solution; rather, it exists in a combined state with a water molecule, as the hydronium ion (H3O+). In practice the hydronium ion is still customarily referred to as the hydrogen ion.

      The acidic behaviour of many well-known acids (e.g., sulfuric, hydrochloric, nitric, and acetic acids) and the basic properties of well-known hydroxides (e.g., sodium, potassium, and calcium hydroxides) are explained in terms of their ability to yield hydrogen and hydroxide ions, respectively, in solution. Furthermore, such acids and bases may be classified as strong or weak acids and bases depending on the hydrogen ion or hydroxide ion concentration produced in solution. The reaction between an acid and a base leads to the formation of a salt and water; the latter is the result of the combination of a hydrogen ion and a hydroxide ion.

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Universalium. 2010.

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