Argead Dynasty


Argead Dynasty

▪ Macedonian ruling house
      ruling house of ancient Macedonia from about 700 to about 311 BC; under their leadership the Macedonian kingdom was created and gradually gained predominance throughout Greece. From about 700 the founder of the dynasty, Perdiccas I, led the people who called themselves Macedonians eastward from their home on the Haliacmon (modern Aliákmon) River. Aegae (Edessa) became the capital, and by the reign of Amyntas I (6th century BC) Macedonian power extended eastward beyond the Axius (Axiós) River to dominate the neighbouring Thracian tribes. Amyntas' successor, Alexander I (reigned before 492–c. 450), advanced his frontiers eastward to the Strymon (Struma) River. His byname, “the Philhellene,” indicates his efforts to win Greek sympathies. He spread the legend deriving his Argead house from the Temenids of Argos and thus obtained admission to the Olympic Games.

      Alexander's son Perdiccas II (reigned c. 450–c. 413) asserted his succession against various brothers and united the Greek cities of Chalcidice in a federation centring on the city of Olynthus. Perdiccas' son Archelaus (reigned c. 413–399) adopted a strongly philhellenic policy, introducing Greek artists to his new capital at Pella. He strengthened Macedonia by building roads and fortresses, improving army equipment, and encouraging city life, and his assassination in 399 was followed by seven years of murder and anarchy.

      Finally, a great-grandson of Alexander I, Amyntas III (Amyntas III (or II)), took the throne in 393/392. Although his reign was filled with anarchy and intrigue, he successfully brought unity to Macedonia. His death in 370/369 left three lawful sons, of whom the first two, Alexander II and Perdiccas III, ruled only briefly. In 359 Amyntas' third son, Philip II, assumed control in the name of Perdiccas' infant heir; having restored order he made himself king (reigned 359–336) and raised Macedonia to a predominant position throughout the whole of Greece. Philip's son Alexander III (Alexander the Great) the Great (reigned 336–323) overthrew the Achaemenian Empire and carried Macedonian arms to the Nile and Indus rivers. On Alexander III's death at Babylon his generals divided up the satrapies of his empire. Although Alexander's two successors, his half-brother Philip III Arrhidaeus and his son Alexander IV, furnished a nominal focus for loyalty until about 311, the real power in the empire lay in other hands.

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