Anthony III Studite


Anthony III Studite

▪ patriarch of Constantinople

died 983, Constantinople [now Istanbul, Turkey]

      Greek Orthodox monk and patriarch of Constantinople (reigned 974–979) who advocated the church's independence from the state. A theological writer, he collaborated in drawing up liturgical literature for Eastern Orthodox worship.

      A monk of the Studios monastery, Anthony became private secretary to Basil I, patriarch of Constantinople. In the struggle for the papal throne waged by Pope Benedict VII (reigned 974–983) and the antipope Boniface VII, who was suspected of having executed the previous pope, Benedict VI, Basil supported the claims of the legitimately elected Benedict VII. Because of Emperor John I Tzimisces' support of the antipope, who was a guest at the Byzantine court, Basil was deposed and Anthony installed as patriarch. Byzantine historians of the 10th century recorded that Anthony, entering the patriarchate at an advanced age, brought to it a moderation and mildness that had been wanting in that office. But his tenacity in upholding the autonomous jurisdiction of the Greek Orthodox church as complementary to the emperor's secular authority brought him into conflict with Emperor Basil II. A reformer, Anthony strove to eliminate the simony (the buying or selling of ecclesiastical offices) that the clergy practiced in order to satisfy imperial taxes on church property. Because of controversy with the emperor over the right of the church to property, Anthony was eventually forced to resign, partly for being implicated in the attempt, in 979, of General Bardas Sclerus to overthrow Basil.

      The single extant work of Anthony is his Monitum (“Admonition”) to monks on penance and confession of sins, a treatise that set a standard for Eastern asceticism.

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Universalium. 2010.

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