Anawrahta


Anawrahta

▪ king of Myanmar
also spelled  Aniruddha 
flourished 11th century AD

      the first king of all of Myanmar, or Burma (reigned 1044–77), who introduced his people to Theravāda Buddhism. His capital at Pagan on the Irrawaddy River became a prominent city of pagodas and temples.

      During his reign Anawrahta united the northern homeland of the Burmese people with the Mon kingdoms of the south. He extended his dominion as far north as the kingdom of Nanchao, west to Arakan, south to the Gulf of Martaban (near what is now Yangon [Rangoon]), and as far east as what is now northern Thailand.

      In 1057 Anawrahta captured the Mon city of Thaton, a centre of Indian civilization. Its fall led the other Mon rulers to submit to Anawrahta; for the first time, a Burmese ruler dominated the Irrawaddy River delta. Contact with the Mons enriched Burmese civilization. The Mons gave the Burmese an artistic and literary tradition and a system of writing. The earliest extant Burmese inscription, written in Mon characters, appeared in 1058.

      Anawrahta was converted to Theravāda (Theravada) Buddhism by a Mon monk, Shin Arahan. As king, Anawrahta strove to convert his people from the influence of the Ari, a Mahāyāna Tantric Buddhist sect that was at that time predominant in central Myanmar. Primarily through his efforts, Theravāda Buddhism became the dominant religion of Myanmar and the inspiration for its culture and civilization. He maintained diplomatic relations with King Vijayabāhu of Ceylon, who in 1071 requested the assistance of Burmese monks to help revive the Buddhist faith. The Ceylonese king sent Anawrahta a replica of the Buddha's tooth relic, which was placed in the Shwezigon pagoda at Pagan.

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Universalium. 2010.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Anawrahta — ( my. .His father was Kunhsaw Kyaunghpyu, who took the throne of Pagan from Nyaung u Sawrahan and in turn was overthrown by the sons of Nyaung u Sawrahan, Kyiso and Sokka te, who forced Kunhsaw Kyaunghpyu to become a monk. When Anawrahta came of… …   Wikipedia

  • Anawrahta — König Anawrahta (auch Aniruddha, Anoarahta und Anoa ra hta soa; Birmanisch , IPA ənɔ̀ja̰tʰa) war zwischen 1044 und 1077 Herrscher von Bagan und vereinigte erstmals die verschiedenen Reiche auf dem heutigen Staatsgebiet von Birma. Anawrahta war… …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • Anawrahta — Stûpa central de la pagode Shwezigon, construite par Anawrahta Anawrahta, Anoratha, Anouraddha ou Aniruddha (birman : အနော်ရထာ API : /ənɔ̀ja̰tʰa/), est un roi birman, fondateur du premier royaume birman unifié, avec …   Wikipédia en Français

  • Anawrahta, King —    (r. 1044 1077)    Also known as Aniruddha, the Burman (Bamar) founding king of the Pagan (Bagan) Dynasty and the first unifier of Upper Burma and Lower Burma. He established what is sometimes called the First Burmese (Myanmar) Empire.… …   Historical Dictionary of Burma (Myanmar)

  • Anawratha — Anawrahta Stûpa central de la pagode Shwezigon, construite par Anawrahta Anawrahta ou Anoratha ou Anouraddha ou Aniruddha (birman : IPA : /ənɔ̀ja̰tʰa/) est un ro …   Wikipédia en Français

  • Kyanzittha — Le Temple de l Ananda, construit par Kyanzittha (1091) Kyanzittha (birman : ကျန်စစ်သား ; API : /tɕàɴsɪʔθá/) est le troisième roi de Pagan après son père et son frère, de 1084 à 1113. Il était fils du roi Anawrahta et d une de s …   Wikipédia en Français

  • Shin Arahan — Le vénérable Shin Arahan (birman ရှင်အရဟံ, ʃɪ̀ɴ ʔəɹəhàɴ ; formellement Dhammadassi Mahathera, birman ဓမ္မဒဿီ မဟာထေရ် …   Wikipédia en Français

  • Bagan (Myanmar) — Tempel in der Ebene von Bagan Bagan [bəgàn] (birmanisch ) ist eine historische Königsstadt in Birma mit über zweitausend erhaltenen …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • Pagan (Myanmar) — Tempel in der Ebene von Bagan Bagan [bəgàn] (birmanisch ) ist eine historische Königsstadt in Birma mit über zweitausend erhaltenen …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • Bagan — 21.17222222222294.860277777778 Koordinaten: 21° 10′ N, 94° 52′ O …   Deutsch Wikipedia


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