Aḥmadīyah


Aḥmadīyah

▪ Islamic group
      a modern Islāmic sect and the generic name for various Ṣūfī (Muslim mystic) orders. The sect was founded in Qādiān, the Punjab, India, in 1889 by Mirza Ghulam Aḥmad (c. 1839–1908), who claimed to be the mahdī (a figure expected by some Muslims at the end of the world), the Christian Messiah, an incarnation of the Hindu god Krishna, and a reappearance (burūz) of Muḥammad. The sect's doctrine, in some aspects, is unorthodox: for example, it is believed that Jesus feigned death and resurrection but in actuality escaped to India, where he died at the age of 120; also, jihād (“holy war”) is reinterpreted as a battle against unbelievers to be waged by peaceful methods rather than by violent military means.

      On the death of the founder, Mawlawi Nur-ad-Din was elected by the community as khalīfah (“successor”). In 1914, when he died, the Aḥmadiyah split, the original, Qadiani, group recognizing Ghulam Aḥmad as prophet (nabī) and his son Hadrat Mirza Bashir-ad-Dīn Mahmud Aḥmad (b. 1889) as the second caliph, the new Lahore society accepting Ghulam Aḥmad only as a reformer (mujaddid).

      The Qadianis, residing chiefly in Pakistan (though there are communities in India and West Africa and to some extent in Great Britain, Europe, and the United States), are a highly organized community with a considerable financial base. They are zealous missionaries, preaching Aḥmadī beliefs as the one true Islām, with Muḥammad and Mirza Ghulam Aḥmad as prophets. In 1947, with the establishment of Pakistan, they officially relocated from Qādiān to Rabwah, Pakistan.

      The Lahore group are also proselytizers, though more concerned in gaining converts to Islām than to their particular sect. Led from its inception to his death in 1951 by Mawlana Muhammad Ali, the sect has been active in English- and Urdu-language publishing and in liberalizing Islām.

      Aḥmadīyah also designates several Ṣūfī orders, the most important of which is that of Egypt named after Aḥmad al-Badawī, one of the greatest saints of Islām (d. 1276). Al-Badawī achieved great fame for his knowledge of Islāmic sciences, but he eventually abandoned speculative theology and devoted himself to contemplation in seclusion. Soon he became known as a miracle-working saint and had thousands of followers. He arrived in Ṭanṭā (south of Cairo, Egypt) in 1236. His followers were also called Suṭūḥīyah from aṣḥāb as-saṭḥ (the people of the roof); according to one anecdote, when al-Badawī arrived at Ṭanṭā, he climbed upon the roof of a private house and stood motionless looking into the sun until his eyes became red and sore. This action was then imitated by some of his followers.

      After al-Badawī's death, the Aḥmadīyah was headed by ʿAbd al-ʿĀl, a close disciple who kept the order under strict rule until his death in 1332. ʿAbd al-ʿĀl inherited the order's symbols: a red cowl, a veil, and a red banner that belonged to al-Badawī. Before his death, ʿAbd al-ʿĀl ordered a chapel built on al-Badawī's tomb, which was later replaced by a large mosque.

      The Aḥmadīyah order, which is representative of the lower type of dervishes, faced great opposition from Muslim legalists, who, in general, opposed all Ṣūfism, and from political figures who felt threatened by the tremendous influence the order had on the masses. Under the Mamlūk dynasty, however, the head of the Aḥmadīyah at times enjoyed considerable privileges and was treated as a dignitary. During the Ottoman rule the Aḥmadīyah suffered from official neglect because of the powerful rivalry from Turkish orders, but this did not lessen in any way the deep veneration for al-Badawī among the Egyptians. The Aḥmadīyah is one of the most popular orders in Egypt, and the three yearly festivals in honour of al-Badawī are major celebrations. Numerous minor orders are considered branches of the Aḥmadīyah and are spread all over the Islāmic world. Among these are the Shinnāwīyah, the Kannāsīyah, the Bayyūmīyah, the Sallāmīyah, the Halabīyah, and the Bundārīyah.

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Universalium. 2010.

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