Āghā Moḥammad Khān


Āghā Moḥammad Khān

▪ shah of Iran

born 1742, Gorgān, Iran
died 1797, near Shusha

      founder and first ruler of the Qājār Dynasty of Iran. Following the disintegration of the Ṣafavid empire in 1722, Qājār tribal chieftains became prominent in Iranian affairs.

      At the age of six Āghā Moḥammad was castrated on the orders of ʿĀdil Shāh to prevent him from becoming a political rival, but this disability did not hinder his career. In 1757 he became the de facto governor of the Azerbaijan province of northern Iran; the next year he succeeded his father as chief of the Qavānlū clan of the Qājārs. In 1762 he was captured by a rival chieftain and sent as a prisoner to Shīrāz, where he spent the next 16 years as a political hostage. In 1779 Āghā Moḥammad escaped and fled to Astarābād, the centre of Qavānlū authority. By 1785, when Tehrān was made the capital, he was the dominant political figure in northern Iran.

      In 1796 Āghā Moḥammad led a successful expedition against the Christian Kingdom of Georgia, which was then reincorporated into Iran. Crowned the same year as shāhanshāh (“king of kings”), he conquered Khorāsān, the last centre of resistance to his authority; its blind ruler, Shāh Rokh (the grandson of Nāder Shāh), was tortured to death.

      The civil war that led to the establishment of the Qājār dynasty, followed by Āghā Moḥammad's conquests, had serious consequences for the prosperity and economy of Iran. Many cities, such as Kermān, were completely sacked. In monetary matters Āghā Moḥammad was tightfisted. The extraordinary cruelty of his reign was in part a means to deter rebellion. During his reign his capital city of Tehrān grew from a village to a city of about 15,000 people. While leading a second expedition into Georgia, Āghā Moḥammad was assassinated by two of his servants. The major legacies of his reign were a unified Iran and a dynasty that ruled it until 1925.

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Universalium. 2010.

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