aggressive mimicry


aggressive mimicry

 a form of similarity in which a predator or parasite gains an advantage by its resemblance to a third party. This model may be the prey (or host) species itself, or it may be a species that the prey does not regard as threatening. An example in which the prey itself serves as the model can be seen in the mimicry used by female fireflies (firefly) of the genus Photuris. These insects imitate the mating flashes of the fireflies of the genus Photinus; the unlucky Photinus males deceived by the mimics are eaten. Another example is found in the brood parasitism practiced by the European cuckoo (Cuculus canorus). The eggs of this species closely resemble those of several kinds of small birds, in whose nests the cuckoo lays its clutch. The hosts accept the eggs as their own and hatch and rear the young cuckoos.

      Aggressive mimicry in which the predator resembles a nonthreatening third party is exemplified by the American zone-tailed hawk, whose resemblance to certain nonaggressive vultures enables it to launch surprise attacks against small animals. In other examples, the aggressor may even mimic the prey of its intended prey. anglerfish, for example, possess a small, mobile, wormlike organ that can be waved on a slender rod in front of other fish; lured in by this organ, which they mistake for their own natural prey, smaller fish are eaten by the anglerfish. In these cases, similar characteristics evolve independently in different lineages, thus reflecting a form of convergent evolution.

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Universalium. 2010.

Look at other dictionaries:

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