Paisley, Ian


Paisley, Ian
▪ 2008
Ian Richard Kyle Paisley 
born April 6, 1926, Armagh, N.Ire.

 On May 8, 2007, as lasting peace appeared to have finally returned to Northern Ireland, longtime Unionist leader Ian Paisley was sworn in as first minister. A militant Protestant leader in the region's sectarian conflict from the 1960s, Paisley relented in his long-held refusal to compromise on Northern Ireland's political status, and in March 2007 the former firebrand agreed to form a power-sharing government with Sinn Fein, the political wing of the Irish Republican Army.

      Paisley, the son of a maverick Baptist minister, was ordained by his father in 1946. He cofounded and became moderator of the Free Presbyterian Church in 1951. (In 1969 he founded the Martyrs Memorial Free Presbyterian Church in Belfast.) Paisley's strength lay in his ability to combine the language of biblical certainty with that of politics, and his ideological message blended fervent anti-Catholicism with militant unionism. From the 1960s he strove to become the leader of extreme Protestant opinion in Northern Ireland by organizing street protests and rallies, which led to frequent confrontations with the authorities and a brief prison term for unlawful assembly in 1966. That year he established the Ulster Constitution Defence Committee and the Ulster Protestant Volunteers, which served as paramilitary adjuncts to his churches.

      In 1970 Paisley was elected to the British Parliament for North Antrim, N.Ire. The next year, in an attempt to broaden his electoral base, he led a split in the Ulster Unionist Party, cofounding the Democratic Unionist Party (DUP). In 1979 he was elected to the European Parliament, where he remained until 2004. Throughout the 1970s and '80s, he sought to turn the DUP into the largest unionist party.

      Although Paisley's personal following was never in doubt, his popularity began to show signs of waning after 1994. Despite his considerable oratorical skills, his vibrant churches, and a well-organized political party, he failed to impede attempts at a negotiated settlement of the conflict in Northern Ireland. In April 1998 eight political parties signed the Good Friday Agreement on steps leading to a power-sharing government. Although Paisley had earlier refused to participate in multiparty talks that included Sinn Fein and had campaigned against the accord in a popular referendum held in May 1998, he won a seat in the new Northern Ireland Assembly.

      By 2003 the DUP had become the largest unionist party in the Assembly, but devolved power had been suspended the previous year. Paisley made modest overtures to Sinn Fein and took part in multiparty talks, though he insisted that the negotiations were with the British government rather than Sinn Fein. He expressed cautious optimism over Sinn Fein's vote in January 2007 to support the Protestant-dominated police force in Northern Ireland. In the March 2007 Assembly elections, the DUP captured 30% of the vote and 36 of the 108 seats; Sinn Fein was second with 28 seats. The power-sharing executive followed soon after. In September 2007 Paisley affirmed that he would resign as moderator of the Free Presbyterian Church in early 2008, but he intended to remain first minister and to run for reelection to the British Parliament if another election was called.

Editor

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▪ Irish clergyman and politician
in full  Ian Richard Kyle Paisley 
born April 6, 1926, Armagh, County Armagh, Northern Ireland
 
 militant Protestant leader in the sectarian conflict that divided Northern Ireland from the 1960s, who was first minister of Northern Ireland from May 2007 to June 2008. He also served as a member of the British Parliament (1970) and the European Parliament (1979–2004).

      The son of a maverick Baptist minister, Paisley was ordained by his father in 1946. He cofounded and became moderator of his own church, the Free Presbyterian Church, in 1951. In 1969 he founded the Martyrs Memorial Free Presbyterian Church in Belfast, Northern Ireland. From 1961 to 1991 membership in his churches increased 10-fold, though the 1991 census indicated that they attracted less than 1 percent of Northern Ireland's population. Paisley's strength lay in his ability to combine the language of biblical certainty with that of politics at a time when many Protestants were uncertain about their constitutional identity and fearful of their physical security. His ideological message combined militant anti-Catholicism with militant unionism.

      From the 1960s Paisley strove to become the leader of extreme Protestant opinion in Northern Ireland by organizing street protests and rallies. These activities led to frequent confrontations with the authorities and a brief prison term for unlawful assembly in 1966. That year he established the Ulster Constitution Defence Committee and the Ulster Protestant Volunteers, which served as paramilitary adjuncts to his churches.

      In 1970 Paisley was elected to the parliaments of Northern Ireland and the United Kingdom. In 1971, in an attempt to broaden his electoral base, he led a split in the Ulster Unionist Party (UUP), cofounding the Democratic Unionist Party (DUP). Throughout the 1970s and '80s he tried to turn the DUP into the largest unionist party, but with the exception of one local council election in 1981, it always finished second, behind the UUP. Although his personal following was never in doubt (in elections to the European Parliament in 1999 he received more votes than any other candidate in Northern Ireland), his popularity showed some signs of waning after 1994.

      Paisley's career was one of consistent protest against the Roman Catholic Church and ecumenism, against British concessions to the Irish government and Irish nationalists, and against members of the Ulster unionist establishment, whom he criticized for their upper-class backgrounds and their perceived willingness to compromise the interests of Northern Ireland's Protestant community (he demanded the resignation of each UUP leader from Terence O'Neill in 1966 to David Trimble (Trimble, David) in 1997). His methods also have been consistent: a combination of parliamentary opposition and extraparliamentary street protest. He has been identified with shadowy private armies such as the Ulster Volunteer Force (UVF), the Third Force, and the Ulster Resistance.

      Despite his considerable oratorical skills, his huge personal following, his vibrant churches, and a well-organized political party, Paisley has failed to impede attempts at a negotiated settlement of the conflict in Northern Ireland, a process that he maintains is driving the province in the direction of Irish unity and away from the United Kingdom. In April 1998 eight political parties signed the Good Friday Agreement on steps leading to a new power-sharing government in Northern Ireland. Although Paisley had earlier refused to participate in multiparty talks that included Sinn Féin (SF), the political wing of the Irish Republican Army (IRA), and campaigned against the accord in a popular referendum held in May 1998, he ran for election the following month and won a seat in the new Northern Ireland Assembly.

 In subsequent years the DUP supplanted the UUP as the leading unionist political party in Northern Ireland. In 2003 it became the largest unionist party in the Northern Ireland Assembly, which would have made Paisley first minister, but devolved power to Northern Ireland had been suspended in 2002. Thereafter, Paisley made modest overtures to Sinn Féin and took part in multiparty talks, though he insisted the negotiations were with the British government rather than Sinn Féin. He expressed cautious optimism over Sinn Féin's vote in January 2007 to support the Protestant-dominated police force in Northern Ireland. In the elections to the Northern Ireland Assembly in March 2007, the DUP finished first, capturing 30 percent of the vote and 36 seats in the 108-member Assembly (compared with 15 percent and 18 seats for the UUP); Sinn Féin was second with 28 seats. The DUP and Sinn Féin subsequently agreed to form a power-sharing government. On May 8, 2007, as devolution returned to Northern Ireland, Paisley was sworn in as first minister, with Sinn Féin's Martin McGuinness as deputy first minister. Despite concerns over their ability to govern jointly, Paisley and McGuinness worked together amicably. In January 2008 Paisley stepped down as moderator of the Free Presbyterian Church, and in June he resigned as first minister and as DUP leader.

Paul Arthur Kimberly Cowell-Meyers Ed.

Additional Reading
Probably the most rounded and sympathetic portrait of Paisley and Paisleyism is Steve Bruce, God Save Ulster! The Religion and Politics of Paisleyism (1986). Also of importance are Ed Moloney and Andy Pollak, Paisley (1986); and Feargal Cochrane, Unionist Politics and the Politics of Unionism since the Anglo-Irish Agreement (1997).

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Universalium. 2010.

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