Dion, Stephane


Dion, Stephane
▪ 2008

born Sept. 28, 1955, Quebec City, Que.

 In 2007, his first year as leader of the Liberal Party of Canada, Stéphane Dion worked to revitalize and rebuild his party, which was badly damaged by a sponsorship scandal in his home province. When Dion arrived at the party leadership convention in December 2006, he was well behind in the polls. His “three-pillar” (environmentalism, social justice, and economic prosperity) approach impressed other party members, however, and on December 2 they elected him the Liberal Party leader.

      Dion, the son of one of the cofounders of Laval University's political science department, grew up during a period known as “the Quiet Revolution,” when Quebec's francophone majority was agitating for more economic opportunities and increasingly favoured political separation from Canada. Although he initially supported the sovereignty movement, his federalist father's systematic dismantling of the separatists' arguments eventually led him to reevaluate his position. Dion pursued a career in academia, graduating with a B.A. (1977) and an M.A. (1979) in political science from Laval and a Ph.D. (1986) in sociology from the Institute of Political Studies in Paris. From 1984 to 1996 he taught political science and public administration courses at the University of Montreal.

      Following the narrow victory of the federalist forces in a 1995 Quebec referendum on sovereignty, Prime Minister Jean Chrétien recruited Dion to run for the Liberal Party in a Montreal-area parliamentary by-election to bolster the cabinet's Quebec contingent. In January 1996 Dion was appointed minister of intergovernmental affairs. In this post he helped to develop the federal government's position that unilateral secession by Quebec would be illegal if it took place without a referendum addressing the question, a clear majority of popular support, and negotiations with the rest of Canada. This position was later affirmed by the Supreme Court of Canada and drafted into federal legislation known as the Clarity Act. Although Dion became popular among Canadians outside the province for his tough position on Quebec separation, he was reviled by many Quebecois who saw the Clarity Act as undermining their right to self-determination.

      He was left out of Prime Minister Paul Martin's first cabinet in December 2003, but following the 2004 general election, which produced a Liberal-led minority government, Dion returned to the cabinet as environment minister. He led a successful attempt to achieve an international agreement for the renewal of the Kyoto Protocol after 2012. When the Liberals lost power in early 2006 and Martin resigned as leader, Dion ran to replace him on a platform that stressed the “three pillars.” Dion, who gained delegate support from other candidates who dropped off the ballot during four rounds of voting, defeated former Harvard University professor Michael Ignatieff in a come-from-behind victory.

William Stos

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▪ Canadian government official
born Sept. 28, 1955, Quebec City, Que., Can.
 
 Canadian politician who became leader of the Liberal Party (Liberal Party of Canada) in 2007.

      Dion was the son of one of the cofounders of Laval University's political science department. He grew up during a period known as “the Quiet Revolution,” when Quebec's francophone majority was agitating for more economic opportunities and increasingly favouring political separation from Canada. Although he initially supported the sovereignty movement, his federalist father's systematic dismantling of the separatists' arguments eventually led him to reevaluate his position. Dion pursued a career in academia, graduating with a B.A. (1977) and an M.A. (1979) in political science from Laval and a Ph.D. (1986) in sociology from the Institute of Political Studies in Paris. From 1984 to 1996 he taught political science and public administration courses at the University of Montreal.

      Following the narrow victory of the federalist forces in a 1995 Quebec referendum on sovereignty, Prime Minister Jean Chrétien (Chrétien, Jean) recruited Dion to run for the Liberal Party in a Montreal-area parliamentary by-election to bolster the cabinet's Quebec contingent. In January 1996 Dion was appointed minister of intergovernmental affairs. In this post he helped to develop the federal government's position that unilateral secession by Quebec would be illegal if it took place without a referendum addressing the question, a clear majority of popular support, and negotiations with the rest of Canada. This position was later affirmed by the Supreme Court of Canada and drafted into federal legislation known as the Clarity Act. Although Dion became popular among Canadians outside the province for his tough position on Quebec separation, he was reviled by many Québécois, who saw the Clarity Act as undermining their right to self-determination.

      Dion was left out of Prime Minister Paul Martin (Martin, Paul)'s first cabinet in December 2003. But following the 2004 general election, which produced a minority Liberal government, Dion returned to the cabinet as environment minister. He led a successful attempt to achieve an international agreement for the renewal of the Kyoto Protocol after 2012. When the Liberals lost power in early 2006 and Martin resigned, Dion ran to replace him as Liberal leader on a platform that stressed what he felt should be the “three pillars” of Canadian politics: environmentalism, social justice, and economic prosperity. Though he was well behind in the polls, Dion's approach impressed other party members. He gained delegate support from other candidates who dropped off the ballot during four rounds of voting, and on Dec. 2, 2007, he was elected head of the party. Dion subsequently worked to revitalize and rebuild his party, which had been badly damaged by a sponsorship scandal in his home province. Running on a Green Shift platform that called for a carbon tax on greenhouse gas emissions, Dion led the Liberals in the federal elections of October 2008, which resulted in a loss of 27 seats for the party and its worse showing ever in terms of the popular vote. Shortly thereafter Dion announced that he was stepping down as the party's leader.

Will Stos
 

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Universalium. 2010.

Look at other dictionaries:

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