Basrur, Sheela


Basrur, Sheela
▪ 2004

      On April 23, 2003, the World Health Organization, fearing the spread of SARS (severe acute respiratory syndrome), announced a travel advisory for Toronto. A storm of outraged protests arose from the mayor, councillors, and provincial and federal politicians. The calm eye at the centre of this turmoil was Sheela Basrur, Toronto's officer of medical health, as she stood before the City Council, refuting WHO's position step by step. With unassailable logic, she laid out her case showing that visitors to Toronto did not face a risk of acquiring SARS and asserted that the epidemic was under control. At the end of her remarks, she received a standing ovation and a bouquet of flowers. WHO lifted its advisory on April 30 and, though there was a second outbreak of SARS in May, did not reimpose it.

      Basrur was no stranger to conflict. In 2000 restaurateurs objected vehemently when she introduced her colour-coded rating system for health-code infractions. She angered them again in 2001 with her support for an antismoking bylaw. In 2002 she aroused wrath in the City Council when she recommended that the city assess the public-health impact of a controversial airport expansion. In May 2003 it was the turn of gardening firms to protest when the City Council, following Basrur's observation that the “cosmetic” use of pesticides created needless public exposure to these contaminants, especially for children, passed a bylaw banning all nonessential use of pesticides.

      Basrur was born in Toronto in 1956, her parents having emigrated from India the year before. Influenced by their careers (her father was a radiation oncologist, while her mother was known internationally for her work in veterinary genetics), Basrur graduated in medicine from the University of Toronto in 1982. After gaining experience as a family practitioner, she took a six-month trip to India, where her passion for preventative health care was aroused. Returning to Canada, she enrolled in a four-year residency in public health at the University of Toronto, followed by programs at the University of Western Ontario and Dalhousie University, Halifax, N.S. Basrur was East York's Medical Officer of Health for six years prior to accepting the position in Toronto in 1997.

      Even though Basrur sometimes faced harsh opposition, she continued to struggle for proper public health funding and maintained her belief that it was her mission to speak for those who could not speak for themselves.

Elizabeth Rhett Woods

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▪ Canadian physician and government official
born Oct. 17, 1956, Toronto, Ont., Can.
died June 2, 2008

      Canadian chief officer of medical health for the city of Toronto (1997–2004) and chief medical officer of health and assistant deputy minister of public health for the province of Ontario (2004–08).

      Basrur was born a year after her parents emigrated to Canada from India. Influenced by their careers (her father was a radiation oncologist, while her mother was known internationally for her work in veterinary genetics), Basrur graduated with a degree in medicine from the University of Toronto in 1982. After gaining experience as a family practitioner, she took a six-month trip to India, where she began to take a strong interest in preventative health care. Returning to Canada, she enrolled in a four-year residency in public health at the University of Toronto, followed by programs at the University of Western Ontario and Dalhousie University, Halifax, N.S. Basrur was East York's Medical Officer of Health for six years prior to accepting the position as officer of medical health in Toronto in 1997.

      Basrur called for a series of public health measures that sometimes attracted strong opposition. In 2000 restaurateurs objected vehemently when she introduced her colour-coded rating system for health-code infractions. She angered them again in 2001 with her support for an antismoking bylaw. In 2002 she aroused wrath in the City Council when she recommended that the city assess the public-health impact of a controversial airport expansion. The following year it was the turn of gardening firms to protest when the City Council, following Basrur's observation that the “cosmetic” use of pesticides created needless public exposure to these contaminants, especially for children, passed a bylaw banning all nonessential use of pesticides.

      In 2003, however, Basrur found widespread support when she refuted the travel advisory imposed on Toronto by the World Health Organization (WHO), which feared the spread of severe acute respiratory syndrome ( SARS). The WHO's position outraged the mayor, councillors, and provincial and federal politicians. Basrur stood before the City Council and—with unassailable logic—laid out her case, showing that visitors to Toronto did not face a risk of acquiring SARS, and asserted that the epidemic was under control. At the end of her remarks, she received a standing ovation and a bouquet of flowers. WHO lifted its advisory by the end of the month and, though there was a second outbreak of SARS in May, did not reimpose it.

Elizabeth Rhett Woods Ed.
      Basrur left her position in 2004 to become the chief medical officer of health and assistant deputy minister of public health for the province of Ontario. In that role she helped to introduce Smoke-Free Ontario legislation that was passed in 2006. She also helped to found the Agency for Health Protection and Promotion in 2007. After being diagnosed with a rare form of cancer in 2007, Basrur stepped down from her positions. Despite intensive medical treatment, she died in 2008.

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Universalium. 2010.

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