Ögödei


Ögödei
born 1185, Mongolia
died 1241, Karakorum

Son of Genghis Khan who succeeded his father in 1229 and greatly expanded the Mongol empire.

He established his headquarters in central Mongolia and built the capital city of Karakorum. Like his father, he carried out simultaneous campaigns by relying on generals who acted independently but were subject to his orders. Allying himself with China's Southern Song dynasty, Ögödei attacked the Juchen dynasty in northern China, taking its capital in 1234. Meanwhile, his nephew Batu defeated Russia while other generals were attacking Iran and Iraq. Only Ögödei's death (during a drinking bout) prevented the Mongols from invading western Europe. See also Golden Horde; Kublai Khan; Möngke.

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▪ Mongol khan
also spelled  Ogadai,  Ogdai,  or  Ugedei  
born 1185, Mongolia
died 1241, Karakorum, Mongolia

      son and successor of the Mongol ruler Genghis Khan (d. 1227), who greatly expanded the Mongol Empire.

      The third son of Genghis, Ögödei succeeded his father in 1229. He was the first ruler of the Mongols to call himself khagan (“great khan”); his father used only the title khan. He made his headquarters on the Orhon River in central Mongolia, where he built the capital city of Karakorum on the site laid out by his father. Like his father, he carried out several simultaneous campaigns, using generals in the field who acted independently but who were subject to his orders. The orders were transmitted by a messenger system that covered almost all of Asia.

      In the East, Ögödei launched an attack on the Jin (Jin dynasty) (Juchen) dynasty of North China. The Song dynasty in South China wished to regain territory lost to the Jin and therefore allied itself with the Mongols, helping Ögödei take the Jin capital at Kaifeng in 1234.

      Ögödei's Chinese adviser, Yelü Chucai, convinced him to reverse previous Mongol policy. Instead of leveling North China and all its inhabitants in the usual Mongol manner, he preserved the country in order to utilize the wealth and skills of its inhabitants. That decision not only saved Chinese culture in North China but it also gave the Mongols access to the Chinese weapons that later enabled them to conquer the technologically superior Song. Knowledge of governmental techniques gained from the people of North China made it possible for the Mongols to be rulers as well as conquerors of China.

      In the western part of his empire, Ögödei sent Mongol armies into Iran, Iraq, and Russia. With the sacking of Kiev in 1240, the Mongols finally crushed Russian resistance. In the next year Mongol forces defeated a joint army of German and Polish troops and then marched through Hungary and reached the Adriatic Sea. Thereafter for more than 200 years Russia remained tributary to the Mongols of the Golden Horde.

      Ögödei died during a drinking bout, and his troops called off their intended invasion of western Europe. His widow, Töregene, ruled as regent until 1246 when she handed over the throne to Güyük, her eldest son by Ögödei. Ögödei is described in contemporary sources as a stern, energetic man given to drinking and lasciviousness.

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Universalium. 2010.

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