xiao


xiao
or hsiao

In Confucianism, the attitude of obedience, devotion, and care toward one's parents and other elders considered fundamental to moral conduct.

Originally rooted in the hierarchical ideology of Chinese feudalism, it was raised to a moral precept by Confucius, who cited it as the basis of ren. It is seen as the basis not only of family harmony but of social and political stability.

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Wade-Giles romanization  hsiao (Chinese: “filial piety”),  Japanese   

      in Confucianism, the attitude of obedience, devotion, and care toward one's parents and elder family members that is the basis of individual moral conduct and social harmony. Xiao consists in putting the needs of parents and family elders over self, spouse, and children, deferring to parents' judgment, and observing toward them the prescribed behavioral proprieties (li).

      Xiao was rooted in China's feudal social structure, in which land was held by large clans whose internal life was structured hierarchically and patriarchally. Confucius raised xiao to a moral precept by citing it as the basis of ren (jen) (“humanity”), the cultivated love of other people that was the Confucian moral ideal. Xiao is not simple obedience but rather deference, and on occasion it even entails remonstrance or gentle admonition. He also delineated the importance of xiao for both family harmony and sociopolitical stability and facilitated its practice by reemphasizing the rites and behaviours associated with it.

      The concept, rendered kō, was adopted in Japan during the 17th century, when Confucianism became the official doctrine of the Tokugawa shogunate.

 Chinese end-blown bamboo flute noted for its mellow and melancholy tone.

      Before the Tang dynasty (618–907 CE), the term xiao denoted a multi-tube instrument later known as the paixiao, or panpipe. Any single tube flute was called di. The transverse flute became increasingly popular during the Tang dynasty, and from that time forward the vertically blown flute was called xiao, the panpipe paixiao (a row of xiao), and the transverse flute was known as the di.

      The xiao first appeared in the Han dynasty (206 BC–220 AD), possibly imported from the Qiang people of what is now northwestern China.

      Most xiao are made of bamboo, but jade, porcelain, and ivory xiao are also known. The modern xiao is about 27 to 30 inches (70 to 80 cm) long, with five finger holes in the front and one thumb hole in the back. Additional holes near the lower end are used for tuning, venting, and attaching decorative tassels. The bottom of the tube is open but the top is closed by the natural node of the bamboo. A small opening connected to a V-shaped notch at the edge allows air to flow through the instrument. The xiao has a range of two octaves.

      The xiao's soft volume and graceful and mellow sound is suitable for both solo playing and blending with the qin (zither). It is also used in small chamber music ensembles. The earliest known xiao is made of bird bone and dates to roughly 6000 BC. Not until the Jin dynasty (AD 265–420) was the number and position of the holes on the instrument standardized, and its name was not finalized until the Ming dynasty (1368–1644).

      A variant of the xiao, the nanyin dongxiao (“southern sound notched flute”), or chiba (literally “one foot, eight inches”) found mainly in Fujian and Taiwan, varies in length from roughly 13 to 16 inches (34 to 43 cm) and uses the bamboo root as its bottom. The number and arrangement of holes on the nanyin dongxiao are the same as those on the xiao, but the body of the nanyin dongxiao is thicker. Although the V-shaped notch is retained, the top end is open, not closed as in the xiao. In performance the player covers the opening with his chin. The nanyin dongxiao is an important instrument in the nanyin (“southern music”; Fujianese) or nanguan (“southern pipes”; Taiwanese) ensemble. It is the prototype that was introduced to Japan in the 14th century and eventually evolved into the shakuhachi.

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Universalium. 2010.

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