social status


social status
Relative rank that an individual holds, with attendant rights, duties, and lifestyle, in a social hierarchy based on honour and prestige.

Status is often ascribed on the basis of sex, age, family relationships, and birth, placing one into a particular social group irrespective of ability or accomplishments. Achieved status, on the other hand, is based on educational attainment, occupational choice, marital status, and other factors involving personal effort. Status groups differ from social classes in being based on considerations of honour and prestige rather than purely economic position. Relative status is a major determinant of people's behaviour toward one another, and competition for status seems to be a prime human motivator.

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also called  status  

      the relative rank that an individual holds, with attendant rights, duties, and lifestyle, in a social hierarchy based upon honour or prestige. Status may be ascribed—that is, assigned to individuals at birth without reference to any innate abilities—or achieved, requiring special qualities and gained through competition and individual effort. Ascribed status is typically based on sex, age, race, family relationships, or birth, while achieved status may be based on education, occupation, marital status, accomplishments, or other factors.

      The word status implies social stratification on a vertical scale. People may be said to occupy high positions when they are able to control, by order or by influence, other people's conduct; when they derive prestige from holding important offices; or when their conduct is esteemed by others. Relative status is a major factor in determining the way people behave toward each other (see role).

      One's status tends to vary with social context. For example, the position of a man in his kin group helps determine his position in the larger community. The Native American Hopi lineage, although unnamed, contains the mechanism for transmitting rights to land, houses, and ceremonial knowledge and is thus vital to personal status. Among the Tallensi of Ghana, a boy who has lost his father is head of a household and therefore counts as an elder; a middle-aged man living under his father's roof is formally a child. Status may be governed by occupational considerations; thus, in parts of sub-Saharan Africa blacksmiths (blacksmith) commonly form a separate group of low status. In the Hindu caste system, sweepers are at the bottom of the scale because they handle excrement.

      In most Western urban-industrial societies, such attributes as a respected occupation, the possession and consumption of material goods, physical appearance and dress, and etiquette and manners have become more important than lineage in determining one's social status. Occupations in these societies tend to be graded along a continuum rather than in a rigid hierarchy.

      Status is closely correlated with etiquette and morality and in many societies rises with the liberal use of wealth (see gift exchange; potlatch). Manipulation of the wealth-status system in such cases often demands great individual effort, aggression, and chicanery.

      Status groups are aggregates of persons arranged in a hierarchical social system. Such groups differ from social classes in being based on considerations of honour and prestige, rather than on economic status or power. Social stratification by status is common in premodern societies. The members of a status group interact mainly within their own group and to a lesser degree with those of higher or lower status. In some societies, clans (clan) or lineages (lineage) may be ranked generally as aristocrats and commoners or graded from a royal clan down to clans that are stigmatized for lowly occupation or slave origin. Perhaps the most striking manifestation of status groups is found in the caste system of India. In Hindu villages there are usually members of a number of small endogamous groups (subcastes) based on traditional occupations, arranged from Brahmans to Untouchables. Contact with a person of lower caste (such as eating or drinking from his hands, bodily contact) pollutes the member of a higher caste and necessitates ritual purification. The age-grade system (see age set) of many traditional East African societies may also resemble a status group.

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Universalium. 2010.

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