smuggling


smuggling
Act of importing and exporting secretly and illegally to avoid paying duties or to evade enforcement of laws (e.g., drug-or firearms-control laws).

Smuggling is probably as old as the first tax or regulation on trade. Two main methods exist: the undetected running of cargoes across frontiers, and the concealment of goods in unlikely places on ships or cars, in baggage or cargo, or on the person.

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      conveyance of things by stealth, particularly the clandestine movement of goods to evade customs duties or import or export restrictions.

      Smuggling flourishes wherever there are high-revenue duties (e.g., on tea, spirits, and silks in 18th-century England, coffee in many European countries, and tobacco almost everywhere) or prohibitions on importation (narcotics) or on exportation (arms and currency).

      Smuggling is probably as old as the first tax or regulation on trade. In the 18th century, tea, tobacco, spices, silks, and spirits were smuggled into England in quantities exceeding those brought in legitimately. In France smuggling against the tobacco monopoly and the exorbitant tax on salt became widespread. Britain could not enforce its mercantilist policy of requiring its colonies to trade with the rest of the world only through the mother country, and by 1744 more than 40 vessels from the American colonies were trading directly with the Spanish empire.

      Attempts by the Chinese government to stop the smuggling of opium led to the opium war of the 1840s. British India in the 19th century suffered smuggling of salt between states with different tax rates, while smuggling of all kinds of dutiable goods occurred between Goa and India and between Gibraltar and Spain. In the latter half of the 19th century, smuggling developed in Africa, particularly of spirits from the Portuguese colonies into the Boer states and from French colonies into the Gold Coast and Nigeria.

      During the 13 years of the prohibition of the sale of liquor in the United States (1920–33), fleets of ships carried liquor from Europe and the West Indies to the Atlantic coast, while truckloads were run all along the Canadian frontier. In the second half of the 20th century, such drugs as heroin, cocaine, and cannabis were products for smuggling worldwide.

      Methods of smuggling change little; all are variants of two main techniques: the undetected running of cargoes across frontiers and the concealment of goods in unlikely places on ships or cars, in baggage or cargo, or on the person.

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Universalium. 2010.

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