silicate mineral


silicate mineral
Any of a large group of silicon-oxygen compounds that are widely distributed throughout much of the solar system.

The silicates make up about 95% of the Earth's crust and upper mantle, occurring as the major constituents of most igneous rocks and in appreciable quantities in sedimentary and metamorphic rocks. They also are important constituents of lunar samples, meteorites, and most asteroids. In addition, planetary probes have detected them on the surfaces of Mercury, Venus, and Mars. Of the approximately 600 known silicate minerals, only the feldspars, amphiboles, pyroxenes, micas, olivines, feldspathoids, and zeolites are significant in rock formation.

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       Silicate minerals Silicate minerals any of a large group of silicon-oxygen compounds that are widely distributed throughout much of the solar system. A brief treatment of silicate minerals follows. For full treatment, see mineral: Silicates (mineral).

      The silicates make up about 95 percent of the Earth's crust and upper mantle, occurring as the major constituents of most igneous rocks and in appreciable quantities in sedimentary and metamorphic varieties as well. They also are important constituents of lunar samples, meteorites, and most asteroids. In addition, planetary probes have detected their occurrence on the surfaces of Mercury, Venus, and Mars. Of the approximately 600 known silicate minerals, only the feldspars, amphiboles, pyroxenes, micas, olivines, feldspathoids, and zeolites are significant in rock formation.

      The basic structural unit of all silicate minerals is the silicon tetrahedron in which one silicon atom is surrounded by and bonded to (i.e., coordinated with) four oxygen atoms, each at the corner of a regular tetrahedron. These SiO4 tetrahedral units can share oxygen atoms and be linked in a variety of ways, which results in different structures. The topology of these structures forms the basis for silicate classification. For example, sorosilicates are silicate minerals consisting of double tetrahedral groups in which one oxygen atom is shared by two tetrahedrons. Inosilicates show a single-chain structure wherein each tetrahedron shares two oxygen atoms. Phyllosilicates have a sheet structure in which each tetrahedron shares one oxygen atom with each of three other tetrahedrons. Tectosilicates show a three-dimensional network of tetrahedrons, with each tetrahedral unit sharing all of its oxygen atoms.

      Details of the linkage of tetrahedrons became known early in the 20th century when X-ray diffraction made the determination of crystal structure possible. Prior to this, the classification of silicates was based on chemical and physical similarities, which often proved to be ambiguous. Although many properties of a silicate mineral group are determined by tetrahedral linkage, an equally important factor is the type and location of other atoms in the structure.

      Silicate minerals can be thought of as three-dimensional arrays of oxygen atoms that contain void spaces (i.e., crystallographic sites) where various cations can enter. Besides the tetrahedral (4-fold coordination) sites, 6-fold, 8-fold, and 12-fold sites are common. A correlation exists between the size of a cation (a positively charged ion) and the type of site it can occupy: the larger the cation, the greater the coordination, because large cations have more surface area with which the oxygen atoms can make contact. Tetrahedral sites are generally occupied by silicon and aluminum; 6-fold sites by aluminum, iron, titanium, magnesium, lithium, manganese, and sodium; 8-fold sites by sodium, calcium, and potassium; and 12-fold sites by potassium. Elements of similar ionic size often substitute for one another. An aluminum ion, for example, is only slightly larger than a silicon ion, allowing substitution for silicon in both tetrahedral and 6-fold sites.

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Universalium. 2010.

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