institutional economics


institutional economics
School of economics that flourished in the U.S. in the 1920s and '30s, which viewed the evolution of economic institutions as part of the broader process of cultural development.

Thorstein Veblen laid the foundation for institutionalism with his criticism of traditional economic theory. He tried to replace the concept of people as the makers of economic decisions with a more realistic image of people as influenced by changing customs and institutions. John R. Commons emphasized the collective action of various groups in the economy, viewed within a system of continually evolving institutions and laws. Other U.S. institutional economists include Rexford Tugwell and Wesley C. Mitchell. See also classical economics, German historical school of economics.

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also known as  institutionalism 

      school of economics that flourished in the United States during the 1920s and '30s. It viewed the evolution of economic institutions as part of the broader process of cultural development.

      American economist and social scientist Thorstein Veblen (Veblen, Thorstein) laid the foundation for institutional economics with his criticism of traditional static economic theory. He tried to replace the concept of people as the makers of economic decisions with the idea that people are continually affected by changing customs and institutions. Veblen saw the primary motive of the American economic system as pecuniary rather than technological: business enterprise, he believed, was carried on for the amassing of money rather than the production of goods. Another economist commonly associated with the institutional school was John R. Commons (Commons, John R.), best known for his labour research. He emphasized the collective action of various groups in the economy and viewed their operation within a system of continually evolving institutions and laws. Others often categorized as institutionalists include American economists Rexford Tugwell (Tugwell, Rexford Guy), John M. Clark (Clark, John Maurice), and Wesley C. Mitchell (Mitchell, Wesley C.).

      Although institutionalism never became a major school of economic thought, its influence has continued, particularly in the works of economists seeking to explain economic problems from a perspective that incorporates social and cultural phenomena. Some see this broad approach as useful in analyzing the problems of developing countries, where modernization of social institutions can be a requirement for industrial progress.

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Universalium. 2010.

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