arupa-loka


arupa-loka
In Buddhism, the "world of immaterial form," the highest of the three spheres of existence in which rebirth takes place.

The others are the "fine-material world" (rupa-loka) and the "world of feeling" (kama-loka). In the arupa-loka, existence depends on the stage of concentration attained in the previous life, of which there are four levels: the infinity of space, the infinity of thought, the infinity of nonbeing, and the infinity of neither consciousness nor nonconsciousness. Beings in the arupa-loka do not have a material body.

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      (Sanskrit and Pāli: “world of immaterial form”), in Buddhist thought, the highest of the three spheres of existence in which rebirth takes place. The other two are rūpa-loka, “the world of form,” and kāma-loka, “the world of feeling” (the three are also referred to as arūpa-dhātu, rūpa-dhātu, and kāma-dhātu, the “realms” of formlessness, form, and feeling).

      In arūpa-loka, existence depends on the stage of concentration attained, and there are four levels: the infinity of space, the infinity of thought, the infinity of nonbeing, and the infinity of neither consciousness nor nonconsciousness. The rūpa-loka, which is free from sensuous desire but is still conditioned by form, is inhabited by gods. It is also further subdivided into the spheres inhabited by Brahmā, by the luminous deities, by the blissful gods, and by the deities of great fruits. Kāma-loka includes the six heavens of the lesser gods and the five lower worlds (the worlds of men, demons, ghosts, animals, and purgatory).

      As superior as is rebirth in the higher worlds, such an existence is nonetheless temporary, subject to change, and involves the fundamental conflicts of existence within the limits of transmigration. This can be broken only by further spiritual insight, resulting in Nirvāṇa and release from the cycle of rebirths.

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Universalium. 2010.

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