Whewell, William


Whewell, William
born May 24, 1794, Lancaster, Lancashire, Eng.
died March 6, 1866, Cambridge, Cambridgeshire

British philosopher and historian.

He spent most of his career at the University of Cambridge, where he taught mineralogy (1828–32) and moral philosophy (1838–55) and served as college master (1841–66). He is remembered primarily for his work on the theory of induction. He stressed the need to see scientific progress as a historical process, asserting that inductive reasoning could be employed properly only if its use throughout history was closely analyzed. His major works on induction are History of the Inductive Sciences (3 vol., 1837) and Philosophy of the Inductive Sciences (1840). See also problem of induction.

Whewell, plaster cast of bust by Edward Hodges Baily, 1851; in the National Portrait Gallery, London

By courtesy of the National Portrait Gallery, London

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▪ British philosopher and historian
born May 24, 1794, Lancaster, Lancashire, Eng.
died March 6, 1866, Cambridge, Cambridgeshire
 English philosopher and historian remembered both for his writings on ethics and for his work on the theory of induction, a philosophical analysis of particulars to arrive at a scientific generalization.

      Whewell spent most of his career at Trinity College, Cambridge, where he studied, tutored, and served as professor of mineralogy (1828–32), professor of moral philosophy (1838–55), and college master (1841–66). He was also vice chancellor of the university (1842).

      His interests in the physical sciences ranged from mechanics and dynamics to tidal phenomena, all subjects for his early writings. Later studies in history and the philosophy of science were followed, after 1850, by his writings on moral theology and by an intensive analysis of the work of Immanuel Kant.

      Whewell is best known for his History of the Inductive Sciences, from the Earliest to the Present Time, 3 vol. (1837), and The Philosophy of the Inductive Sciences, Founded upon Their History (1840), which later was expanded to three separate books: History of Scientific Ideas, 2 vol. (1858), Novum Organon Renovatum (1858), and On the Philosophy of Discovery (1860). The second of these books refers to Francis Bacon's Novum Organum (1620), dealing with inductive reasoning.

      Although his work on the theory of induction was overshadowed by that of John Stuart Mill, Whewell's contribution lay in his resurrection of inductive reasoning as an important issue for philosophers and scientists alike. In particular, he stressed the need to see scientific progress as a historical process and asserted that inductive reasoning could be employed properly only if its use throughout history was closely analyzed.

      Whewell's theological views, which gave rise to his ethical theories, have been assigned an importance secondary to his work in induction. Among his writings in moral philosophy are The Elements of Morality, Including Polity (1845) and Lectures on Systematic Morality (1846). Whewell also wrote sermons, poetry, essays, and several editions and translations of others' works.

Additional Reading
Marion Rush Stoll, Whewell's Philosophy of Induction (1929).

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Universalium. 2010.

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  • Whewell, William — (24 may. 1794, Lancaster, Lancashire, Inglaterra–6 mar. 1866, Cambridge, Cambridgeshire). Filósofo e historiador británico. Su carrera transcurrió principalmente en la Universidad de Cambridge, donde enseñó mineralogía (1828–32) y filosofía moral …   Enciclopedia Universal

  • WHEWELL, WILLIAM —    professor of the science of things in general, born at Lancaster, son of a joiner; studied at Trinity College, Cambridge, of which he became successively fellow, tutor, professor, and master; was a man of varied attainments, of great… …   The Nuttall Encyclopaedia

  • Whewell, William — (1794 1866)    Philosopher, theologian and mathematician, s. of a joiner at Lancaster, where he was b., ed. at Camb., where he had a brilliant career. He became Prof. of Mineralogy at Camb. 1828, of Moral Theology 1838, was Master of Trinity from …   Short biographical dictionary of English literature

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