Vatican Council, Second


Vatican Council, Second
(1962–65) 21st ecumenical council of the Roman Catholic church, announced by Pope John XXIII.

It has come to symbolize the church's readiness to acknowledge the circumstances of the modern world. Among the most notable of the 16 documents enacted were the "Dogmatic Constitution on the Church," which treats church hierarchy and provides for greater involvement of laypeople in the church; the "Dogmatic Constitution of Divine Revelation," which maintains an open attitude toward scholarly study of the Bible; the "Constitution on the Sacred Liturgy," which provides for the use of vernacular languages in the mass in place of Latin; and the "Pastoral Constitution on the Church in the World of Today," which acknowledges the profound changes humanity has experienced in the modern world and attempts to relate the church to contemporary culture. Observers from other Christian churches were invited to the council in a gesture of ecumenism.

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▪ Roman Catholic history [1962-65]
 21st ecumenical council of the Roman Catholic Church (1962–65), announced by Pope John XXIII on Jan. 25, 1959, as a means of spiritual renewal for the church and as an occasion for Christians separated from Rome to join in search for reunion. Preparatory commissions appointed by the Pope prepared an agenda and produced drafts (schemata) of decrees on various topics. In opening the council on Oct. 11, 1962, the Pope advised the council fathers to try to meet the pastoral needs of the church. Those summoned to the council included all Catholic bishops and certain other church dignitaries. Invited to the council sessions, but without the right to vote, were a number of observers from the major Christian churches and communities separated from Rome and a number of Catholics called auditors.

      The work of the preparatory commissions had been done by members of the Curia (the papal bureaucracy); once the council had been opened, however, council fathers from diverse parts of the world were added to the commissions. The revised decrees that grew out of the council discussions and the work of the enlarged commissions tended to have a more progressive viewpoint. The work of the council continued under Pope John's successor, Paul VI, and sessions were convened each autumn until the work of the council was completed on Dec. 8, 1965. Sixteen documents were enacted by the council fathers.

      The “Dogmatic Constitution on the Church” reflects the attempt of the council fathers to utilize biblical terms rather than juridical categories to describe the church. The treatment of the hierarchical structure of the church counterbalances somewhat the monarchical emphasis of the first Vatican Council's teaching on the papacy by giving weight to the role of the bishops. The teaching of the constitution on the nature of the laity (those not in holy orders) was intended to provide the basis for the call of lay people to holiness and to share in the missionary vocation of the church. By describing the church as the people of God, a pilgrim people, the council fathers provided the theological justification for changing the defensive and inflexible stance that had characterized much of Catholic thought and practice since the Protestant Reformation.

      The “Dogmatic Constitution on Divine Revelation” attempts to relate the role of Scripture and tradition (the postbiblical teaching of the church) to their common origin in the Word of God that has been committed to the church. The document affirms the value of Scripture for the salvation of men while maintaining an open attitude toward the scholarly study of the Bible.

      The “Constitution on the Sacred Liturgy” establishes the principle of greater participation by the laity in the celebration of mass and authorizes significant changes in the texts, forms, and language used in the celebration of mass and the administration of the sacraments.

      The “Pastoral Constitution on the Church in the World of Today” acknowledges the profound changes humanity is experiencing and attempts to relate the church's concept of itself and of revelation to the needs and values of contemporary culture.

      The council also promulgated decrees (documents on practical questions) on the pastoral duties of bishops (bishop), ecumenism, the Eastern-rite churches, the ministry and life of priests, the education for the priesthood, the religious life, the missionary activity of the church, the apostolate of the laity, and the media of social communication. Furthermore, declarations (documents on particular issues) on religious freedom, the church's attitude toward non-Christian religions, and on Christian education were produced. These documents reflected the renewal in various areas of church life begun decades before Pope John—biblical, ecumenical, liturgical, lay apostolate. The impulse of the documents and the council deliberations in general had by the early 1970s been felt in nearly every area of church life and had set in motion many changes that may not have been foreseen by the council fathers.

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Universalium. 2010.

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