Turkish language


Turkish language
Turkic language of Turkey, spoken by about 90% of its population.

Turkish has about 59 million speakers, with many enclaves in the Balkans and Cyprus (dating from Ottoman times) and in western Europe. Turkish was introduced into Anatolia with the invasion of Turkmen tribes in the 13th–14th centuries. Anatolian Turkish, written in the Arabic alphabet, is first attested in the 13th century. Ottoman Turkish was so heavily influenced by Persian and Arabic that it lost some of its Turkic characteristics and was incomprehensible to lower social strata. Efforts to re-Turkicize the language began in the 18th century but did not make serious gains until the 20th century and the founding of the Turkish republic. Much Perso-Arabic vocabulary was removed, and the Latin alphabet was adopted with the addition of diacritics to symbolize sounds peculiar to Turkish.

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Turkish  Türkçe, or Türkiye Türkçesi,  

      the major member of the Turkic language family, which is a subfamily of the Altaic languages. Turkish is spoken in Turkey, Cyprus, and elsewhere in Europe and the Middle East. With Gagauz, Azeri (Azerbaijani), Turkmen, and Khorāsān Turkic, it forms the southwestern, or Oğuz, branch of the Turkic languages.

      Modern Turkish is the descendant of Ottoman Turkish and its predecessor, so-called Old Anatolian Turkish, which was introduced into Anatolia by the Seljuq Turks in the late 11th century AD. Old Turkish gradually absorbed a great many Arabic and Persian words and even grammatical forms and was written in Arabic script. After the founding of the Turkish republic in 1923, the Arabic script was replaced by the Latin alphabet (1928). The reform of the language was initiated and supported by the Turkish republican government. In spite of disputes and resistance, the movement contributed greatly to purifying the Turkish vocabulary of foreign elements. An essentially new literary language emerged, and the older one soon became obsolete.

      From the point of view of linguistic development, four periods of Turkish may be differentiated: Old (Anatolian and Ottoman) Turkish, 13th–16th century; Middle (Ottoman) Turkish, 17th–18th century; Newer (Ottoman) Turkish, 19th century; and Modern Turkish, 20th century.

      Turkish morphology is subject to sound harmony, of which palatal and labial vowel harmony is the most salient feature. Palatal harmony is based on a distinction between front vowels (e, i, ö, ü) and back vowels (a, ı, o, u). As a rule, all the vowels of a word belong to the same class (back or front)—e.g., sargı ‘bandage,' sergi ‘exhibition'—and the vowels of suffixes vary according to the class of vowels in the primary stem—e.g., ev-de ‘in the house,' but oda-da ‘in the room.' In morphology Turkish is marked by its tendency to expand the primary stem with different suffixes, of which many designate grammatical notions. Thus parasızlıklarından ‘because of their poverty' is composed of para ‘money,' -sız ‘-less,' -lık ‘-ness,' -lar = plural, ı(n) = possessive, -dan = ablative ‘from, due to.'

      Syntactically, Turkish, like other Turkic languages, tends to use constructions with verbal nouns, participles, and converbs in cases where English would use constructions with subordinative conjunctions or relative pronouns—e.g., geleceğini biliyorum ‘I know that (s)he will come' (literally ‘come-[future]-its-[accusative] know-[present]-I'), otelde kalan dostumuz ‘our friend who is staying in the hotel' (literally ‘hotel-in staying friend-our'), and gülerek girdi ‘(s)he entered laughing' (literally ‘laughing enter-[past]-(s)he').

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Universalium. 2010.

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