Turin, Shroud of


Turin, Shroud of
Linen fragment that for centuries was said to be the burial garment of Jesus.

It has been preserved since 1578 in the royal chapel of the Cathedral of San Giovanni Battista in Turin, Italy. Measuring 14 ft 3 in. by 3 ft 7 in. (4.3 m by 1.1 m), it appears to portray images of the back and front of a gaunt, sunken-eyed man. The images contain markings that correspond to the stigmata and stains presumed to be blood. It emerged historically in 1354 and went on exhibition in 1389, first as a representation of the true shroud and eventually as the genuine article. In 1988 independent tests determined that the cloth was made с 1260–1390.

* * *

relic
also called  Holy Shroud , Italian  Santa Sindone 

      a length of linen that for centuries was purported to be the burial garment of Jesus Christ; it has been preserved since 1578 in the royal chapel of the Cathedral of San Giovanni Battista in Turin, Italy. Measuring 14 feet 3 inches long and 3 feet 7 inches wide, it seems to portray two faint brownish images, those of the back and front of a gaunt, sunken-eyed, 5-foot 7-inch man—as if a body had been laid lengthwise along one half of the shroud while the other half had been doubled over the head to cover the whole front of the body from face to feet. The images contain markings that allegedly correspond to the stigmata of Jesus, including a thorn mark on the head, lacerations (as if from flogging) on the back, bruises on the shoulders, and various stains of what is presumed to be blood.

      The shroud first emerged historically in 1354, when it is recorded in the hands of a famed knight, Geoffroi de Charnay, Seigneur de Lirey. In 1389, when it went on exhibition, it was denounced as false by the local bishop of Troyes, who declared it “cunningly painted, the truth being attested by the artist who painted it.” The Avignon antipope Clement VII (reigned 1378–94) sanctioned its use as an object of devotion provided that it were exhibited as a “representation” of the true shroud. Subsequent popes, from Julius II on, however, took its authenticity for granted. In 1453, Geoffroi de Charnay's granddaughter Marguerite gave the shroud to the house of Savoy at Chambéry, and there it was damaged by fire and water in 1532. It was moved to the new Savoyard capital of Turin in 1578. Ever since, it has been publicly exhibited only rarely, as, in recent times, on the marriage of Prince Umberto (1931) and on the 400th anniversary of its arrival in Turin (1978).

      Scholarly analyses—attempting to use scientific methods to prove or disprove its authenticity—have been applied to the shroud since the late 19th century. It was early noticed (1898) that the sepia-tone images on the shroud seem to have the character of photographic negatives rather than positives. Beginning in the 1970s, tests were made to determine whether the images were the result of paints (or other pigments), scorches, or other agents; none of the tests proved conclusive. In 1988 the age of the cloth itself was finally determined. Three laboratories in different countries were provided with postage-stamp–sized pieces of the shroud's linen cloth. Having subjected these samples to carbon-14 dating, all three laboratories concluded that the cloth of the shroud had been made sometime between AD 1260 and 1390. The Roman Catholic church accepted the results and announced that the Shroud of Turin was not authentic, but the church encouraged Christians to continue venerating the shroud as an inspiring pictorial image of Christ.

* * *


Universalium. 2010.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Turin, Shroud of — • A relic now preserved at Turin, for which the claim is made that it is the actual clean linen cloth in which Joseph of Arimathea wrapped the body of Jesus Christ Catholic Encyclopedia. Kevin Knight. 2006 …   Catholic encyclopedia

  • Turin Shroud — Turin Shroud, the a piece of cloth which is believed by some people to have covered the dead body of Jesus Christ after he had been crucified and to be marked with an image of his face. But scientists who tested the cloth using ↑carbon dating… …   Dictionary of contemporary English

  • Turin shroud — a cloth reputed to be the shroud in which Christ was wrapped after the crucifixion; modern scientific dating indicates that it is of medieval date …   Medieval glossary

  • Turin, Shroud of — …   Useful english dictionary

  • Radiocarbon 14 dating of the Turin Shroud — Radiocarbon dating of the Turin Shroud was the most famous scientific study performed on the artifact. The radiocarbon dating was carried out in 1988 and dated the cloth is to between 1260 and 1390 C.E., compatible with the first recorded mention …   Wikipedia

  • Shroud of Turin — The Shroud of Turin: modern photo of the face, positive left, negative right. Negative has been contrast enhanced. The Shroud of T …   Wikipedia

  • Turin — For other uses, see Turin (disambiguation). Torino redirects here. For other uses, see Torino (disambiguation). Turin Torino   Comune   Comune di Torino …   Wikipedia

  • Turin Cathedral — Exterior view of the church. Turin Cathedral (Italian: Duomo di Torino) is the major Roman Catholic church of Turin, northern Italy. Dedicated to Saint John the Baptist (Italian: San Giovanni Battista), it was built during 1491 1498 and it is… …   Wikipedia

  • Turin — /toor in, tyoor , too rin , tyoo /, n. a city in NW Italy, on the Po: capital of the Kingdom of Italy 1860 65. 1,188,689. Italian, Torino. * * * Italian Torino City (pop., 2001 prelim.: 857,433), Piedmont region, northwestern Italy. Located on… …   Universalium

  • Turin — • The chief town of a civil province in Piedmont and was formerly the capital of the Duchy of Savoy and of the Kingdom of Sardinia Catholic Encyclopedia. Kevin Knight. 2006. Turin     Turin   …   Catholic encyclopedia


Share the article and excerpts

Direct link
Do a right-click on the link above
and select “Copy Link”

We are using cookies for the best presentation of our site. Continuing to use this site, you agree with this.