Tenure of Office Act


Tenure of Office Act
(1867) Law forbidding the U.S. president to remove civil officers without the consent of the Senate.

Passed by the Radical Republicans over the veto of Pres. Andrew Johnson, the measure sought to prevent Johnson from removing cabinet members who supported Congress's harsh Reconstruction policies. When Johnson tried to dismiss his secretary of war, Edwin M. Stanton, an ally of the Radical Republicans, Congress began impeachment proceedings against him. The law was partially repealed in 1869 and completely repealed in 1887; in 1926 it was found unconstitutional.

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United States [1867]
 (March 2, 1867), in the post-Civil War period of U.S. history, law forbidding the president to remove civil officers without senatorial consent. The law was passed over Pres. Andrew Johnson's (Johnson, Andrew) veto by Radical Republicans (Radical Republican) in Congress in their struggle to wrest control of Reconstruction from Johnson. Vigorously opposing Johson's conciliatory policy toward the defeated South, the Radicals gained enough strength in the congressional elections of 1866 to impose their military and civil program upon the defeated territory in the spring of 1867. At the same time, to further ensure the success of Radical Reconstruction, Congress passed the Tenure of Office Act. The act was often taken to have been aimed specifically at preventing President Johnson from removing from office Secretary of War Edwin Stanton (Stanton, Edwin M), the Radicals' ally in the Cabinet, although during congressional debate on the bill some Republicans declared that Cabinet members would be exempt. Still, the President's attempt to thwart this law by dismissing Stanton led directly to his impeachment the following year. The Tenure of Office Act was repealed partly in 1869 and entirely in 1887 and was also declared by the U.S. Supreme Court in 1926 to have been unconstitutional.

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Universalium. 2010.