Tange Kenzō


Tange Kenzō
born Sept. 4, 1913, Imabari, Shikoku, Japan

Japanese architect.

Tange worked in the office of Maekawa Kunio before setting out on his own. His best-known early work was the Peace Centre, Hiroshima (1946–56). His Kagawa prefectural offices in Takamatsu (1955–58) were a particularly fine blend of the modern and traditional. In 1959 he and his students published the Boston Harbor project, launching the Metabolist school. His work in the 1960s took more boldly dramatic form, and he became a master at manipulating complex geometries; his National Gymnasium for Tokyo's 1964 Olympic Games is exemplary. During 1966–70 he designed the master plan for the Japan World Exposition (Expo 70), which was held in Ōsaka. More recent works include the New Tokyo City Hall complex (1991). Also influential as a writer, teacher, and town planner, Tange was awarded the Pritzker Architecture Prize in 1987.

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▪ Japanese architect
born September 4, 1913, Ōsaka, Japan
died March 22, 2005, Tokyo

      one of the foremost Japanese architects in the decades following World War II.

      After graduating from Tokyo Imperial University (now the University of Tokyo) in 1938, Tange worked in the office of Maekawa Kunio, an architect who had studied with Le Corbusier (Corbusier, Le). In 1942 Tange returned to the university to study city planning, and in 1949 he was named professor there; he became professor emeritus in 1974. His first completed structure was a pavilion at the Kōbe Industry and Trade Fair of 1950, and his first major commission involved the reconstruction of Hiroshima. In addition to planning the city, he helped design Hiroshima's Peace Memorial Park, and its peace centre (1950) and museum (1952) are among his best-known early works. In the years that followed, he designed an outstanding series of public buildings, including the Tokyo Metropolitan Government Office (1957), the Shizuoka Convention Hall (1957), city halls at Kurayoshi (1957) and Kurashiki (1960), and the Kagawa prefectural offices (1958), the latter being considered a particularly fine example of the blending of modern and Japanese traditional architecture. Most of these early structures were conventional rectangular forms using light steel frames.

      Tange's work during the 1960s took more boldly dramatic forms with the use of reinforced concrete and innovative engineering. For the 1964 Olympic Games in Tokyo, he designed the National Gymnasiums; the two structures featured sweeping curved roofs and an asymmetrical but balanced design that masterfully assimilated traditional techniques. During the same period, Tange also designed St. Mary's Cathedral in Tokyo, a bold cruciform design with stark, soaring roofs made of stainless steel.

      Tange fulfilled many important overseas commissions during the 1960s and '70s, including embassies and university buildings in Taiwan, Saudi Arabia, Algeria, and Iran. During 1966–70 he designed the master plan for the Japan World Exposition (Expo 70), which was held in Ōsaka. In his later structures he built up combinations of smaller geometric forms into an irregular but functionally attentive whole. Tange continued to design buildings into the early 21st century, and notable later works included the Overseas Union Bank (1986) in Singapore, the Singapore National Library (1998), and the Tokyo Dome Hotel (2000). In 1987 he was awarded the prestigious Pritzker Architecture Prize.

      Tange was also influential as a writer, teacher, and town planner. Some of his best-known publications translated into English were A Plan for Tokyo (1960), Katsura: Tradition and Creation in Japanese Architecture (1960), Ise: Prototype of Japanese Architecture (1962), and Architecture and Urban Design (1975).

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Universalium. 2010.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Tange Kenzo — Kenzō Tange (jap. 丹下 健三, Tange Kenzō; * 4. September 1913 in Sakai; † 22. März 2005 in Tokio) war ein über die Grenzen Japans hinaus bekannter Architekt. Er galt als Hauptvertreter des „Neuen Bauens“ in seinem Land. Auch leistete er einen… …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • Tange Kenzō — Kenzō Tange (jap. 丹下 健三, Tange Kenzō; * 4. September 1913 in Sakai; † 22. März 2005 in Tokio) war ein über die Grenzen Japans hinaus bekannter Architekt. Er galt als Hauptvertreter des „Neuen Bauens“ in seinem Land. Auch leistete er einen… …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • TANGE, Kenzo — (1913 2005)    Kenzo Tange, one of the premier 20th century architects from Japan, witnessed the development of his home country out of the devastation of war and into a prosperous, modern world power with international economic interests. Tange… …   Historical Dictionary of Architecture

  • Tange, Kenzo — ▪ 2006       Japanese architect and teacher (b. Sept. 4, 1913, Osaka, Japan d. March 22, 2005, Tokyo, Japan), embodied the Japanese reverence for the past while embracing the future in such breathtaking structures as his sports stadiums notably… …   Universalium

  • Tange Kenzo — (4 sep. 1913, Imabari, Shikoku, Japón–22 mar. 2005, Tokio). Arquitecto japonés. Trabajó en la oficina de Maekawa Kunio antes de establecerse en forma independiente. Entre sus primeros trabajos, el más conocido fue el Centro de Paz, en Hiroshima… …   Enciclopedia Universal

  • Tange, Kenzo — ► (1913 2005) Arquitecto japonés. Entre sus obras destacan el Ayuntamiento de Shimizu, el Centro de Prensa y Radio, en Kofu, el Centro de la Paz, en Hiroshima, la Prefectura de Kagawa, el edificio para el Museo de Historia, etc. Es importante… …   Enciclopedia Universal

  • Tange — Tange, Kenzo …   Enciclopedia Universal

  • Kenzo Tange — Kenzō Tange (jap. 丹下 健三, Tange Kenzō; * 4. September 1913 in Sakai; † 22. März 2005 in Tokio) war ein über die Grenzen Japans hinaus bekannter Architekt. Er galt als Hauptvertreter des „Neuen Bauens“ in seinem Land. Auch leistete er einen… …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • Kenzō Tange — Présentation Naissance 4 septembre 1913 Ōsaka (Japon) Décès 22 mars 2005 (à 91 ans) Tōkyō (Japon) Nationalité …   Wikipédia en Français

  • Kenzō Tange — Información personal Nacimiento 4 de septiembre de 1913 Sakai, Japón …   Wikipedia Español


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