Sutton, Walter S(tanborough)


Sutton, Walter S(tanborough)
born 1877, Utica, N.Y., U.S.
died Nov. 10, 1916, Kansas City, Kan.

U.S. geneticist.

He received a medical degree from Columbia University and practiced surgery the rest of his life. In 1902 he provided the earliest detailed demonstration that somatic chromosomes (those in cells other than sex cells) occur in distinct pairs of like chromosomes, hypothesizing that chromosomes carry the units of inheritance and that their behaviour during meiosis is the physical basis of Gregor Mendel's concept of heredity. In 1903 he concluded that chromosomes contain units of heredity (now known as genes) and that their behaviour during meiosis is random. His work formed the basis for the chromosomal theory of heredity.

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▪ American geneticist
born 1877, Utica, N.Y., U.S.
died Nov. 10, 1916, Kansas City, Kan.

      U.S. geneticist who provided the first conclusive evidence that chromosomes carry the units of inheritance and occur in distinct pairs.

      Sutton worked under Clarence E. McClung, one of the investigators who elucidated the chromosomal basis for sex determination, at the University of Kansas (M.A., 1901), and later (1907) he completed medical training at Columbia University. In 1909 he began the practice of surgery in Kansas City, Kan., and Kansas City, Mo.; he continued to practice until his death.

      While a student at Columbia, he wrote two papers that greatly affected the history of genetics. Published in 1902 in the Biological Bulletin, “On the Morphology of the Chromosome Group in Brachystola magna” provided the earliest detailed demonstration that the somatic chromosomes (those in cells other than sex cells) of a grasshopper occur in definite, distinguishable, and different pairs of like (or homologous) chromosomes. The paper ended with the hypothesis that chromosomes carry the units of inheritance and that their behaviour during division of the chromosomes of sex cells (meiosis) is the physical basis of the Mendelian law of heredity. Sutton developed this hypothesis in “The Chromosomes in Heredity” (1903) and concluded that chromosomes contain hereditary units and that their behaviour during meiosis is random. His work formed the basis for the chromosomal theory of heredity.

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Universalium. 2010.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Sutton, Walter S(tanborough) — (1877, Utica, N.Y., EE.UU.–10 nov. 1916, Kansas City, Kan.). Genetista estadounidense. Se graduó de médico en la Universidad de Columbia y practicó la cirugía el resto de su vida. En 1902 proporcionó la primera demostración detallada de que los… …   Enciclopedia Universal

  • Walter — Walter, Bruno Walter, John * * * (as used in expressions) Adams, Walter S(ydney) Alvarez, Luis W(alter) Bagehot, Walter Walter Lanier Barber Beaton, Sir Cecil (Walter Hardy) Benjamin, Walter Brattain, Walter H(ouser) Richard Walter Jenkins, Jr.… …   Enciclopedia Universal

  • Sutton — ► C. de Gran Bretaña, en Inglaterra, uno de los 32 municipios que forman el Gran Londres; 168 900 h. * * * (as used in expressions) Rank, J(oseph) Arthur, barón Rank (de Sutton Scotney) Sutton Hoo Sutton, Walter S(tanborough) …   Enciclopedia Universal

  • heredity — /heuh red i tee/, n., pl. heredities. Biol. 1. the transmission of genetic characters from parents to offspring: it is dependent upon the segregation and recombination of genes during meiosis and fertilization and results in the genesis of a new… …   Universalium

  • cytology — cytologic /suyt l oj ik/, cytological, adj. cytologically, adv. cytologist, n. /suy tol euh jee/, n. the study of the microscopic appearance of cells, esp. for the diagnosis of abnormalities and malignancies. [1885 90; CYTO + LOGY] * * * Study of …   Universalium


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