Shinbutsu shūgō


Shinbutsu shūgō
Japanese amalgamation of Buddhism and Shintō.

The hybridization began on Buddhism's appearance in Japan (mid-6th century AD), and the practice of building Shintō and Buddhist shrines near each other developed in the 8th century. To separate the two religions, the government issued an edict in 1868 ordering Buddhist priests connected with Shintō shrines either to be reordained as Shintō priests or to return to lay life. Because the state religion was Shintō, the government abolished Buddhist ceremonies in the imperial household. Nevertheless, most Japanese incorporate elements of both religions in their lives, celebrating life-related events (birth, coming of age, marriage) at Shintō shrines but holding Buddhist funeral rites and memorial services.

* * *

▪ Japanese religion
      in Japan, amalgamation of Buddhism with the indigenous religion Shintō. The precedents for this amalgamation were laid down almost as soon as Buddhism entered Japan in the mid-6th century, and the process of blending Buddhism with Shintō has dominated the religious life of the people up to the present. Even today Japanese frequently retain in their homes both Shintō god shelves (kamidana) and Buddhist altars (butsudan) and observe Shintō rites for marriage and Buddhist rites for funerals.

      The pattern of coexistence first began to emerge in the Nara period (AD 710–784). Before construction of the Daibutsu (“Great Buddha”) at Nara in AD 741, the proposal to build the statue was first reported to Amaterasu Ōmikami, the Shintō sun goddess, at the Ise Shrine, the chief shrine of Japan. Aid was also requested of the kami (god) Hachiman, and a branch of the (Shintō) Usa Hachiman Shrine on the island of Kyushu was built in the compound of the (Buddhist) Tōdai Temple to protect it. From that time a practice developed of building Shintō shrines in Buddhist temple compounds and temples or pagodas near Shintō shrines, and also of reciting Buddhist scriptures at Shintō shrines.

      In the Heian period (9th–12th century), Shintō kami came to be identified as incarnations of the Buddha, and for a time Shintō priests were dominated by Buddhist ecclesiastics and were relegated to a secondary role even in Shintō rites. During the general spiritual awakening of the Kamakura period (AD 1192–1333), however, Shintō attempted to emancipate itself from Buddhist domination, and the Ise Shintō (q.v.) movement claimed that Shintō divinities were not incarnations of the Buddha but that buddhas and bodhisattvas (buddhas-to-be) were rather manifestations of Shintō kami.

      The separation of the two religions was one of the early reforms of the Meiji (Meiji Restoration) regime, which in 1868 issued an edict ordering Buddhist priests connected with Shintō shrines either to be reordained as Shintō priests or to return to lay life. Buddhist temple lands were confiscated and Buddhist ceremonies abolished in the imperial household. Shintō was proclaimed as the national religion; later it was reinterpreted as a suprareligious national cult (see State Shintō).

* * *


Universalium. 2010.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Shinbutsu-Shugo — Shintōistische und buddhistische Figuren als auch Architekturelemente beim Jōgyō ji in Kamakura Shinbutsu Shūgō (jap. 神仏習合) oder auch Shinbutsu Konkō (神仏混交) ist die japanische Bezeichnung für den Shintō bzw. Kami …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • Shinbutsu-shugo — Shintōistische und buddhistische Figuren als auch Architekturelemente beim Jōgyō ji in Kamakura Shinbutsu Shūgō (jap. 神仏習合) oder auch Shinbutsu Konkō (神仏混交) ist die japanische Bezeichnung für den Shintō bzw. Kami …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • Shinbutsu-shūgō — Shintōistische und buddhistische Figuren als auch Architekturelemente beim Jōgyō ji in Kamakura Shinbutsu Shūgō (jap. 神仏習合) oder auch Shinbutsu Konkō (神仏混交) ist die japanische Bezeichnung für den Shintō bzw. Kami …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • Shinbutsu Shugo — Shintōistische und buddhistische Figuren als auch Architekturelemente beim Jōgyō ji in Kamakura Shinbutsu Shūgō (jap. 神仏習合) oder auch Shinbutsu Konkō (神仏混交) ist die japanische Bezeichnung für den Shintō bzw. Kami …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • Shinbutsu Shūgō — Shintōistische und buddhistische Figuren als auch Architekturelemente beim Jōgyō ji in Kamakura Shinbutsu Shūgō (jap. 神仏習合) oder auch Shinbutsu Konkō (神仏混交) ist die japanische Bezeichnung für den Shintō bzw. Kami …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • Shinbutsu shugo — Shintōistische und buddhistische Figuren als auch Architekturelemente beim Jōgyō ji in Kamakura Shinbutsu Shūgō (jap. 神仏習合) oder auch Shinbutsu Konkō (神仏混交) ist die japanische Bezeichnung für den Shintō bzw. Kami …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • Shinbutsu shūgō — Shintōistische und buddhistische Figuren als auch Architekturelemente beim Jōgyō ji in Kamakura Shinbutsu Shūgō (jap. 神仏習合) oder auch Shinbutsu Konkō (神仏混交) ist die japanische Bezeichnung für den Shintō bzw. Kami …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • Shinbutsu-Shūgō — Shintōistische und buddhistische Figuren als auch Architekturelemente beim Jōgyō ji in Kamakura Shinbutsu Shūgō (jap. 神仏習合) oder auch Shinbutsu Konkō (神仏混交) ist die japanische Bezeichnung für den Shintō bzw. Kami …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • Shinbutsu shūgō — nihongo|Shinbutsu shūgō|神仏習合 literally fusion of kami and buddhas (also called nihongo| Shinbutsu konkō |神仏混淆, term which however has a negative connotation) is the Japanese syncretism of Buddhism and local religious beliefs. When Buddhism was… …   Wikipedia

  • Shinbutsu shugo —     Amalgamation of Buddhas and kami . A rather vague term applied to the syncretism or synthesis of Buddhism with local religious practices from the Nara period onwards. In line with its assimilative philosophy Buddhism adopted local spirits as… …   A Popular Dictionary of Shinto


Share the article and excerpts

Direct link
Do a right-click on the link above
and select “Copy Link”

We are using cookies for the best presentation of our site. Continuing to use this site, you agree with this.