Seven Oaks Massacre


Seven Oaks Massacre
(1816) Destruction of a Canadian fur-trading settlement.

Sixty Métis, directed by an agent of the North West Co., attempted to run provisions past the rival Hudson's Bay Co. settlement on the Red River. They were intercepted by the colony's governor and 25 soldiers at Seven Oaks, near the settlement. An argument grew into a fight in which the Métis killed 20 men, including the governor. They then threatened the remaining settlers with massacre, forcing them to abandon the colony. The settlement was restored the next year.

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▪ Canadian history
      (1816), destruction of the Hudson's Bay Company's (Hudson's Bay Company) Red River Settlement in what is now Manitoba, Canada, by agents of the rival North West Company.

      On June 19, 1816, a party of about 60 Métis under Cuthbert Grant, a North West Company employee, set out to run provisions for North West Company canoes past the Red River colony; they plundered some outlying posts on the Assiniboine River and then stopped at a place called Seven Oaks, near the Hudson's Bay Company's post at Fort Douglas. Robert Semple, the governor of the colony and governor in chief of the Hudson's Bay Company's territories in North America, led a group of about 25 soldiers and settlers to parley with the Métis. A fight broke out in which Semple and 20 of his men were killed; Grant lost only one man. The Métis gave no quarter to their wounded opponents, and in the following days they forced the remaining settlers to leave under the threat of massacre. The destruction of the Red River colony, however, was only temporary; it was restored the following year.

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Universalium. 2010.