Saichō


Saichō
or Dengyō Daishi

born 767, Ōmi province, Japan
died 822, Hiei-zan

Monk who established the Tendai (Chinese Tiantai) sect of Buddhism in Japan.

Ordained at age 13, he studied in China and returned with the teachings of Tendai Buddhism, which embraced the Lotus Sutra. Unlike other Buddhist sects in Japan, it asserted that the material world could hold meaning and value and that the teachings of the Buddha are accessible to all, not just a select few. Saichō enjoyed favour with the government but often incurred the enmity of the leaders of other Japanese Buddhist sects. The monastery he built on Mount Hiei became one of the great centres of Buddhist learning.

* * *

▪ Japanese monk
posthumous name Dengyō Daishi
born 767, Ōmi province, Japan
died 822, Hiei-zan

      monk who established the Tendai sect of Buddhism in Japan.

      A priest at the age of 13, Saichō was sent to China to study in 804 and returned with the highly eclectic Tendai (T'ien-t'ai (Tiantai) in Chinese) teachings. Unlike other Buddhist sects then in existence in Japan, the Tendai sect taught that there could be meaning and value in the external material world and that the teachings of the Buddha are accessible to all, not just to a select few.

      Saichō built his monastery on Hiei-zan near Kyōto. He soon became a favourite of the emperor and received the court's generous patronage, which made his monastery one of the most powerful centres of Buddhist learning. While the monks of the older Buddhist sects lived in the cities, Saichō required his monks to spend 12 years in seclusion under strict discipline on Hiei-zan. He foreshadowed later Japanese Buddhist trends in his reverence for the Shintō deities and his emphasis on the patriotic mission of Buddhism. Frequently engaged in polemics with other Buddhist leaders, Saichō was more significant as a leader and organizer than as a religious thinker.

* * *


Universalium. 2010.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Saichō — (最澄) Painting of Saichō School Tendai …   Wikipedia

  • Saicho — Saichō Statue représentant Saichō Saichō (最澄, 767–822) était un moine bouddhiste fondateur de la branche Tendai du bouddhisme au Japon. Sommaire 1 Biographi …   Wikipédia en Français

  • Saichô — Saichō Statue représentant Saichō Saichō (最澄, 767–822) était un moine bouddhiste fondateur de la branche Tendai du bouddhisme au Japon. Sommaire 1 Biographi …   Wikipédia en Français

  • Saïchô — Saichō Statue représentant Saichō Saichō (最澄, 767–822) était un moine bouddhiste fondateur de la branche Tendai du bouddhisme au Japon. Sommaire 1 Biographi …   Wikipédia en Français

  • Saichō — Saltar a navegación, búsqueda Estatua de Saichō en Hōshakuzan Nōfuku ji (宝積山 能福寺), Kōbe Saichō (最澄 …   Wikipedia Español

  • Saichō —   [ tʃo], postum Dengyō Daishi [ ʃi], japanischer Priester, * Provinz Ōmi (Präfektur Shiga) 767, ✝ auf dem Hieizan (bei Kyōto) 822; konzentrierte seine Studien auf die drei Hauptwerke der chinesischen Tiantai Schule (Tendai sandaibu), ging 804… …   Universal-Lexikon

  • SAICHO — SAICH 牢 (767 822) Moine bouddhiste japonais, fondateur de la secte Tendai, Saich 拏, né à Shiga, dans la province d’ 牢mi, fait ses études au Kokubun ji de cette province. En 785, ayant reçu les défenses complètes, il demanda et obtint… …   Encyclopédie Universelle

  • Saicho — Statue des Saichō im Hōshakuzan Nōfuku ji (宝積山 能福寺), Kōbe Saichō (jap. 最澄, (Höchste Klarheit), 9. September 767–26. Juni 822) war ein japanischer buddhistischer Mönch, der als Gründer der traditionsreichen Tendai shū in Japan gilt. Aufbauend auf… …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • Saichō — Statue des Saichō im Hōshakuzan Nōfuku ji (宝積山 能福寺), Kōbe Saichō (jap. 最澄, „Höchste Klarheit“; * 9. September 767; † 26. Juni 822) war ein japanischer buddhistischer Mönch, der als Gründer der traditionsrei …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • Saichō — Statue représentant Saichō Saichō (最澄, 767–822) était un moine bouddhiste fondateur de la branche Tendai du bouddhisme au Japon. Sommaire 1 Biographie …   Wikipédia en Français


Share the article and excerpts

Direct link
Do a right-click on the link above
and select “Copy Link”

We are using cookies for the best presentation of our site. Continuing to use this site, you agree with this.