Romanesque architecture


Romanesque architecture
Architecture current in Europe from about the mid-11th century to the advent of Gothic architecture.

A fusion of Roman, Carolingian and Ottonian, Byzantine, and local Germanic traditions, it was a product of the great expansion of monasticism in the 10th–11th century. Larger churches were needed to accommodate the numerous monks and priests, as well as the pilgrims who came to view saints' relics. For the sake of fire resistance, masonry vaulting began to replace timber construction. Romanesque churches characteristically incorporated semicircular arches for windows, doors, and arcades; barrel or groin vaults to support the roof of the nave; massive piers and walls, with few windows, to contain the outward thrust of the vaults; side aisles with galleries above them; a large tower over the crossing of nave and transept; and smaller towers at the church's western end. French churches commonly expanded on the early Christian basilica plan, incorporating radiating chapels to accommodate more priests, ambulatories around the sanctuary apse for visiting pilgrims, and large transepts between the sanctuary and nave.

* * *


Universalium. 2010.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Romanesque architecture — is the term that is used to describe the architecture of Middle Ages Europe which evolved into the Gothic style beginning in the 12th century. The term Romanesque , meaning descended from Roman , was used to describe the style from the early 19th …   Wikipedia

  • ROMANESQUE ARCHITECTURE —    The Romanesque style, named for the classical Roman features that characterize it, dates to the 11th and 12th centuries and features a thriving artistic culture. Medieval monastic communities enjoyed a continued growth, and towns often grew up …   Historical Dictionary of Architecture

  • Romanesque architecture — noun a style of architecture developed in Italy and western Europe between the Roman and the Gothic styles after 1000 AD; characterized by round arches and vaults and by the substitution of piers for columns and profuse ornament and arcades • Syn …   Useful english dictionary

  • Regional characteristics of Romanesque architecture — Romanesque architecture is the term that is used to describe the architecture of Europe which emerged in the late 10th century and evolved into the Gothic style during the 12th century. The Romanesque style in England is more traditionally… …   Wikipedia

  • List of Romanesque architecture — urviving Romanesque buildingsListed below are examples of surviving buildings in Romanesque style in Europe.FranceRomanesque architecture expands in France through monasteries. Burgundy was the center of monastic life in France one of the most… …   Wikipedia

  • Architecture of Portugal — refers to the architecture practised in the territory of present day Portugal since before the foundation of the country, in the 12th century. The term may also refer to buildings created under Portuguese influence or by Portuguese architects… …   Wikipedia

  • Romanesque art — refers to the art of Western Europe from approximately 1000 AD to the rise of the Gothic style in the 13th century, or later, depending on region. The preceding period is increasingly known as the Pre Romanesque. The term was invented by 19th… …   Wikipedia

  • Romanesque — can refer to: *Romanesque art, the art of Western Europe from approximately 1000 AD to the 13th century or later *Romanesque architecture, architecture of Europe which emerged in the late 10th century and lasted(new production) to the 13th… …   Wikipedia

  • Architecture of Norway — Storage …   Wikipedia

  • Romanesque Revival architecture — The Dekum Building, in Portland, Oregon. Romanesque Revival (or Neo Romanesque) is a style of building employed beginning in the mid 19th century[1] inspired by the 11th and 12th century Romanesque architecture. Unlike the historic Romanesque sty …   Wikipedia


Share the article and excerpts

Direct link
Do a right-click on the link above
and select “Copy Link”

We are using cookies for the best presentation of our site. Continuing to use this site, you agree with this.