Platte River


Platte River
River, central Nebraska, U.S. Formed by the confluence of the North Platte and South Platte rivers, it is 310 mi (500 km) long.

It flows southeast into a big bend at Kearney, Neb., then empties into the Missouri River at Plattsmouth, south of Omaha. It is too shallow for navigation and is almost dry for much of the year. Its waters are used for irrigation and municipal water systems.

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      river of Nebraska, U.S., formed at the city of North Platte by the confluence of the North Platte (North Platte River) and South Platte (South Platte River) rivers. The Platte proper is 310 miles (500 km) long, but measured from its source stream, Grizzly Creek in Colorado (via the North Platte River), the system has a length of 990 miles (1,590 km). The Platte flows southeast into a big bend at Kearney, curves northeast, and travels east, south, and east again before emptying into the Missouri River at Plattsmouth, about 20 miles (32 km) south of Omaha. Other cities along the river include Lexington, Grand Island, Columbus, and Fremont. The extreme shallowness of the river (whose name comes from the French plat, “flat”) precludes navigation. The wide, flat valley of the Platte was a primary route of westward journeys in the mid-19th century; the Mormon and Oregon trails followed it. The river serves as an important part of the continental bird migration route, providing habitat for millions of migrating birds such as sandhill and whooping cranes. The Platte drains an area of some 90,000 square miles (233,000 square km). The vast quantities of water diverted for irrigation agriculture and municipal use are significant aspects of the Platte River system; more than a dozen dams regulate water flow and have significantly decreased the river's width. The Loup and Elkhorn rivers are the main tributaries of the Platte.

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Universalium. 2010.