Murad, Ferid


Murad, Ferid
born Sept. 14, 1936, Whiting, Ind., U.S.

U.S. pharmacologist.

He received his M.D. and Ph.D. from Western Reserve University (later Case Western Reserve University). Murad showed that nitroglycerin and related heart drugs induce the formation of nitric oxide, a gas that increases the diameter of blood vessels. Along with Robert F. Furchgott and Louis J. Ignarro, he was awarded a 1998 Nobel Prize for the discovery that nitric oxide acts as a signaling molecule in the cardiovascular system. Their combined work uncovered an entirely new mechanism for how blood vessels relax and widen. This discovery led to the development of the drug Viagra, which is used to treat erectile dysfunction.

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▪ American scientist
born Sept. 14, 1936, Whiting, Ind., U.S.

      American pharmacologist, who, along with Robert F. Furchgott (Furchgott, Robert F.) and Louis J. Ignarro (Ignarro, Louis J.), was co-awarded the 1998 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine for the discovery that nitric oxide (NO) acts as a signaling molecule in the cardiovascular system. Their combined work uncovered an entirely new mechanism for how blood vessels (blood vessel) in the body relax and widen.

      Murad received his M.D. and Ph.D. from Western Reserve University (later Case Western Reserve University) in Cleveland, Ohio, in 1965. In addition to his clinical practice, Murad taught pharmacology at the University of Virginia School of Medicine, Charlottesville (1975–81), at Stanford University (1981–89), and then at Northwestern University (1988). While at Stanford he ventured into the private sector as a vice president of Abbott Laboratories (1988–92) and then became president of the Molecular Geriatrics Corporation (1993–95). He began teaching at the medical school of the University of Texas, Houston, in 1997.

      In 1977 Murad showed that nitroglycerin and several related heart drugs induce the formation of nitric oxide and that the colourless, odourless gas acts to increase the diameter of blood vessels in the body. Furchgott and Ignarro built on this work. About 1980 Furchgott demonstrated that cells in the endothelium, or inner lining, of blood vessels produce an unknown signaling molecule, which he named endothelium-derived relaxing factor (EDRF). This molecule signals smooth muscle cells in blood vessel walls to relax, dilating the vessels. Ignarro's research, conducted in 1986 and done independently of Furchgott's work, identified EDRF as nitric oxide. These discoveries led to the development of the anti-impotence drug sildenafil citrate (Viagra) and had the potential to unlock new approaches for understanding and treating other diseases.

      The Nobel Assembly of the Karolinska Institute in Stockholm, which presented the prize, said that the identification of a biological role for nitric oxide was surprising for several reasons. Nitric oxide was known mainly as a harmful air pollutant, released into the atmosphere from automobile engines and other combustion sources. In addition, it was a simple molecule, very different from the complex neurotransmitters and other signaling molecules that regulate many biological events. No other gas is known to act as a signaling molecule in the body.

      Murad was also the recipient of the Albert Lasker Basic Medical Research Award in 1996 for his discovery. Murad and Ignarro collaborated on Nitric Oxide: Biochemistry, Molecular Biology, and Therapeutic Implications (1995).

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Universalium. 2010.

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