Mughal architecture


Mughal architecture
Building style that flourished in India under the Mughal emperors from the mid16th to the late 17th century.

The Mughal period marked a striking revival of Islamic architecture in northern India, where Persian, Indian, and various provincial styles were fused to produce works of great refinement. White marble and red sandstone were favoured materials. Most of the early Mughal buildings used arches only sparingly, relying on post-and-beam construction. The use of the double dome, a recessed archway inside a rectangular fronton (arena), and parklike surroundings are typical of the Shah Jahan period (1628–58), when Mughal design reached its zenith. Symmetry and balance between the parts of a building were stressed, as was delicate ornamental detail. Important Mughal undertakings include the Taj Mahal and the palace-fortress at Delhi (begun 1638).

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      building style that flourished in northern and central India under the patronage of the Mughal emperors from the mid-16th to the late 17th century. The Mughal period marked a striking revival of Islāmic architecture in northern India. Under the patronage of the Mughal emperors, Persian, Indian, and various provincial styles were fused to produce works of unusual quality and refinement.

      The tomb of the emperor Humāyūn (begun 1564) at Delhi inaugurated the new style, though it shows strong Persian influences. The first great period of building activity occurred under the emperor Akbar (Akbar period architecture) (reigned 1556–1605) at Āgra (Agra) and at the new capital city of Fatehpur Sīkri, which was founded in 1569. The latter city's Great Mosque (1571; Jāmiʿ Masjid), with its monumental Victory Gate (Buland Darzāwa), is one of the finest mosques of the Mughal period. The great fort at Āgra (1565–74) and the tomb of Akbar at Sikandarā, near Āgra, are other notable structures dating from his reign. Most of these early Mughal buildings use arches only sparingly, relying instead on post and lintel construction. They are built of red sandstone or white marble.

      Mughal architecture reached its zenith during the reign of emperor Shāh Jahān (Shāh Jahān period architecture) (1628–58), its crowning achievement being the magnificent Tāj Mahal (Taj Mahal) (q.v.). This period is marked by a fresh emergence in India of Persian features that had been seen earlier in the tomb of Humāyūn. The use of the double dome, a recessed archway inside a rectangular fronton, and parklike surroundings are all typical of Shāh Jahān period buildings. Symmetry and balance between the parts of a building were always stressed, while the delicacy of detail in Shāh Jahān decorative work has seldom been surpassed. White marble was a favoured building material. After the Tāj Mahal, the second major undertaking of Shāh Jahān's reign was the palace-fortress at Delhi, begun in 1638. Among its notable buildings are the red-sandstone-pillared Dīvān-e ʿĀmm (“Hall of Public Audience”) and the so-called Dīvān-e Khāṣṣ (“Hall of Private Audience”), which housed the famous Peacock Throne. Outside the citadel is the Great Mosque (1650–56; Jāmiʿ Masjid). The impressive mosque sits on a raised foundation and is approached by a majestic flight of steps, with an immense courtyard in front.

      The architectural monuments of Shāh Jahān's successor, Aurangzeb (reigned 1658–1707), represent a distinct decline, though some notable mosques were built before the beginning of the 18th century. Subsequent works lost the balance and coherence characteristic of mature Mughal architecture.

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Universalium. 2010.

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