Mithra


Mithra
In Indo-Iranian myth, the god of light.

He was born bearing a torch and armed with a knife, beside a sacred stream and under a sacred tree, a child of the earth itself. He soon rode, and later killed, the life-giving cosmic bull, whose blood fertilizes all vegetation. This deed became the prototype for a bull-slaying fertility ritual. As god of light, Mithra was associated with the Greek Helios and the Roman Sol Invictus. The first written reference to Mithra dates to 1400 BC. See also Mithraism.

* * *

▪ Iranian god
also spelled  Mithras,  Sanskrit  Mitra,  

      in ancient Indo-Iranian mythology, the god of light, whose cult spread from India in the east to as far west as Spain, Great Britain, and Germany. (See Mithraism.) The first written mention of the Vedic Mitra dates to 1400 BC. His worship spread to Persia and, after the defeat of the Persians by Alexander the Great, throughout the Hellenic world. In the 3rd and 4th centuries AD, the cult of Mithra, carried and supported by the soldiers of the Roman Empire, was the chief rival to the newly developing religion of Christianity. The Roman emperors Commodus and Julian were initiates of Mithraism, and in 307 Diocletian consecrated a temple on the Danube River to Mithra, “Protector of the Empire.”

      According to myth, Mithra was born, bearing a torch and armed with a knife, beside a sacred stream and under a sacred tree, a child of the earth itself. He soon rode, and later killed, the life-giving cosmic bull, whose blood fertilizes all vegetation. Mithra's slaying of the bull was a popular subject of Hellenic art and became the prototype for a bull-slaying ritual of fertility in the Mithraic cult.

      As god of light, Mithra was associated with the Greek sun god, Helios, and the Roman Sol Invictus. He is often paired with Anahita, goddess of the fertilizing waters.

* * *


Universalium. 2010.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • MITHRA — Persis dicitur Sol. Strad. l. 15. Τιμῶσι δὲ καὶ Η῞λιον, ὅν Μίθραν καλοῦσι. Plut. in l. de Iside, et Osiride, post relatam eorum sententiam, qui duos esse Deos credebant, quasi adversarios et ἀντιτέχνους, quorum alter Bona, alter Mala operaretur,… …   Hofmann J. Lexicon universale

  • Mithra — (in den späteren Pehlewi u. Parsischriften: Mihir), eine altarische Gottheit, welche in den Veda s der alten Inder zu den Söhnen der Aditi gehört, als die Gottheit des Lichts zu fassen ist u. gewöhnlich mit Varunas (Uranos der Griechen), dem Gott …   Pierer's Universal-Lexikon

  • Mithra —    Mithra, or Mitra, first appears as a god in the Vedic Hymns, where he is mentioned some hundred and seventy times. He would appear to have been a human being who became elevated to divine rank after his death, which occurred before the Aryans… …   Who’s Who in non-classical mythology

  • Mithra — steht für: einen persischen Gott; siehe Mithras (4486) Mithra, einen Asteroiden Siehe auch Mitra Diese Seite ist eine Begriffsklärung zur Unterscheidung mehrerer mit dem …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • Mithra — Mithra, ein Sonnen und Lichtgott der Iranier, wie der Mitra der stammverwandten Inder. An ihn wendet sich ein im Zendavesta erhaltenes Opfergebet, der »Mihiryasht«, worin er teils als Sonnengott geschildert wird, der seinen Sitz auf der Hara… …   Meyers Großes Konversations-Lexikon

  • Mithra — Mi thra, Mithras Mi thras, prop. n. [L., from Gr. ?.] The sun god of the ancient Persians; the god of light and truth. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Mithra — (Mitra), indo eranische Gottheit, bei den Indern früh verblaßt, dagegen bei den Eraniern im Avesta eine hervorragende Rolle als Gott des Lichtes und der Treue spielend. Der Mithrakultus herrschte auch in Persien und in Armenien; in der spätern… …   Kleines Konversations-Lexikon

  • Mithra — Mithra, Mithras, pers. Lichtgottheit, die vergötterte und personificirte Sonne, Vermittler zwischen Ormuzd u. der Erde, dessen Dienst sich über Vorderasien und selbst über das röm. Europa verbreitete. Dargestellt wird M. als ein Jüngling mit… …   Herders Conversations-Lexikon

  • Mithra — divinité des Perses, probablement issue du dieu indien Mitra qui représentait le Soleil …   Encyclopédie Universelle

  • mithra — ou mithras (mi tra ou mi tras ) s. m. Le soleil, divinité des anciens Perses. ÉTYMOLOGIE    Le terme grec vient d un mot persan ; sanscr. Mitra, nom d une des divinités solaires védiques, proprement ami …   Dictionnaire de la Langue Française d'Émile Littré

  • Mithra — This article is about the Zoroastrian yazata Mithra. For other divinities with related names, see the general article Mitra. Part of a series on Zoroastrianism …   Wikipedia


Share the article and excerpts

Direct link
Do a right-click on the link above
and select “Copy Link”

We are using cookies for the best presentation of our site. Continuing to use this site, you agree with this.