Ma Yuan


Ma Yuan
or Ma Yüan

born с 1160/65, Qiantang, Zhejiang province
died 1225

Chinese landscape painter.

Born into a family of court painters, Ma Yuan began his career under the emperor Xiaozong, became daizhao ("painter-in-attendance") under Emperor Guangzong, and received the highest honour, the Golden Belt, under Emperor Ningzong. Apart from these facts, little is known about Ma's life. He occasionally painted flowers and figure subjects, but it was in landscape painting that his genius lay. He executed a number of large landscape screens, all of which are now lost. He also painted tall hanging scrolls depicting steep mountains with streams, waterfalls, and vigorously yet elegantly rendered pine trees. In many of his works, the mountains are pushed to one side, creating a "one corner" composition; between the distant mountains and the foreground rocks, where a scholar may be sitting, lies an expanse of empty space with a suggestion of mist or water. Ma's style was popular with late Song painters, and it is often difficult to distinguish his works from those of his followers. The romantic landscape style of Ma and his contemporary Xia Gui inspired a school of painting that came to be known as the Ma-Xia school, characterized by asymmetrical compositions with simplified ink tones and angular brushstrokes.

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▪ Chinese general
Wade-Giles romanization  Ma Yüan , courtesy name (zi)  Wenyuan 
born 14 BCE, Maoling [now in Shaanxi province], China
died 49 CE, Hunan

      Chinese general who helped establish the Dong (Eastern) Han dynasty (25–220 CE) after the usurpation of power by the minister Wang Mang ended the Xi (Western) Han dynasty (206 BCE–25 CE).

      Ma began his career in the service of Wang Mang, but, when revolts erupted throughout the countryside in opposition to Wang's policies, Ma joined the minister's enemies. He eventually took service under Guangwudi (reigned 25–57/58 CE), a member of the Han imperial family who made himself emperor and reestablished the Han dynasty. In 35 CE Ma was appointed governor of Longxi, and in 41 he was sent to South China, where he reinstituted Chinese rule in the area as far south as present-day northern Vietnam. In 45 Ma was sent to the northern frontier, where he helped subdue the Xiongnu tribes of Central Asia.

      After his death he was enshrined as a god and, until modern times, was worshipped as the wave-quelling god of Guangxi province in South China.

      Ma Yuan was a noted judge of horses and wrote a book on that subject.

▪ Chinese painter
Introduction
born c. 1160/65, Qiantang [now Hangzhou], Zhejiang province
died 1225

      influential Chinese landscape painter whose work, together with that of Xia Gui, formed the basis of the Ma-Xia school of painting. Ma occasionally painted flowers, but his genius lay in landscape painting, his lyrical and romantic interpretation becoming the model for later painters. He was a master of “one-corner” painting, in which visual interest is focused in a corner of the work. His style was often copied, and it is sometimes difficult to separate genuine works from those of his followers.

Early life and works
      Ma was born into a family of court painters: his great grandfather, Ma Fen, had been daizhao (i.e., painter in attendance) at the Northern Song court about 1119–25; both his grandfather Ma Xingzu and his father, Ma Shirong, held the same rank at the Southern Song court in the middle decades of the 12th century. Ma Yuan began his career under the emperor Xiaozong, became daizhao under Emperor Guangzong, and received the highest Chinese honour, the Golden Belt, under Emperor Ningzong. He died in about 1225. His son Ma Lin, the last of the Ma artistic dynasty, rose to be painter-in-waiting, zhihou. Apart from these bare facts, practically nothing is known about Ma's life. Being neither a scholar nor an official, he did not leave a body of his own writings and he did not earn a biography in the dynastic history. He seems, however, to have been in high favour at court, particularly under Ningzong, who, with his empress, Yang Meizi, wrote poems or short inscriptions inspired by a number of his paintings.

      Ma occasionally painted flowers and figure subjects. A group of small, delicate flower paintings in the National Palace Museum in Taipei, Taiwan, are attributed to him. Typically, a single spray of blossoms lies poised in empty space across the square album leaf. One of these works is signed, and two bear couplets written by Yang. There are also three paintings of Zen masters in simple landscape settings, two of them in Tenryū Temple, Kyōto, Japan, the third in the Tokyo National Museum, which, though not signed, bear inscriptions considered to be in the handwriting of Yang. They all have certain similar features of technique that have led some Japanese authorities to attribute them to Ma.

Landscape painting
      It was in landscape painting that Ma's genius lay. He executed a number of large landscape screens, all of which are now lost. He also painted tall, hanging scrolls in which, according to an early Chinese writer, “there are steep mountains rising imposingly, with streams winding around them and waterfalls partly hidden among the trees.” The author also wrote that Ma made his pine trees “very tall and strong as if they were made of iron wire; sometimes he painted them with a stump brush; the effect is vigorous, beautiful and elegant.” Typical of this kind of picture is the tall, unsigned Rain over Trees on a Rocky Shore in the Seikadō Foundation in Tokyo. The monumental composition, the expressive use of monochrome ink, and the powerful angularity of the brush work, in which the artist hacks out the facets of his rocks by means of a slanting “ax-cut” stroke, are features that first had been developed by Li Tang, the senior landscapist in the Imperial Academy in the last years of the Northern Song dynasty. Although Li may not have lived long enough to see the Song court reestablished at Lin'an (now Hangzhou) in 1136, his influence there was profound, and his style of landscape painting became the orthodox manner for Southern Academy painters, being transmitted down to Ma through a follower, Xiao Zhao, and through Ma's own forebears.

Later works and influence
      By the late 12th century, however, this style was changing, and the new elements that were appearing reflected the nostalgic and somewhat precious atmosphere of the exiled court at Lin'an. In some hanging scrolls attributed to Ma, and in many of the exquisite small album and fan paintings, the mountains are pushed to one side, creating a “one corner” composition; between the distant mountains and the strongly accented foreground rocks, where a scholar may be sitting enjoying the view, lies a vast expanse of empty space with but a suggestion of mist or water. Many of Ma's pictures are romantic night scenes. A particularly moving hanging scroll of this kind, attributed to him and bearing a long poem composed by the emperor and written by Yang, is the unsigned version of the Banquet by Lantern Light in the National Palace Museum in Taipei.

      Such paintings are redolent of a poetic melancholy that hints at the decay of Song culture, and the pictorial expression of this feeling is often rather conventional. The one-sided composition, the jutting pine tree silhouetted against empty space, the meditating scholar, and the brilliant brush technique of Ma all lent themselves easily to imitation. His style was popular with late Song painters, men and women, professionals and amateurs, and it is often difficult to separate the genuine fans and album leaves by Ma from those of his followers. Among the best of the surviving works are Early Spring and Two Sages and an Attendant beneath a Plum Tree, both in the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston; Watching the Deer by a Pine-shaded Stream, in the Mr. and Mrs. Dean Perry Collection, Cleveland, Ohio; and On a Mountain Path in Spring, a signed album leaf bearing a couplet written by the emperor Ningzong, in the National Palace Museum in Taipei.

      Finally, a small group of hand scrolls shows another facet of Ma's genius. Most striking, and most likely to be from his hand, is the picture The Four Sages of Shangshan (recluses who lived at the beginning of the Han dynasty), in the Cincinnati Art Museum in Ohio. Although damaged and poorly restored, the picture presents a dramatic contrast between the vital handling of the landscape and raging torrent and the extreme delicacy and precision of the figures of the scholars and their attendants, qualities that suggest the hand of a great master. The scroll is signed and bears 40 colophons or seals of the various owners, including one by the noted Yuan dynasty scholar-painter Ni Zan (1301–74). A signed long scroll of mountains and pine trees in deep winter snow in the Imperial Museum in Beijing, though roughly painted, is an extremely impressive work that may be a product of Ma's old age.

      The romantic landscape style of the Southern Song academicians such as Ma, his son Ma Lin, and Xia Gui went out of fashion after the fall of the dynasty in 1279. It was revived in the Ming dynasty (1368–1644) as a form of decorative academicism by professional painters of the so-called Zhe school. The style was not greatly admired by gentlemen and connoisseurs, who considered it too brilliantly professional for their taste. As a result, few high-quality paintings of the Ma-Xia school survived in China outside the imperial collection. Their work, however, found favour in Japan, where it was a powerful influence in forming the style of the great ink painters Shūbun (early 15th century) and Sesshū and of the early masters of the Kanō school during the Muromachi period (1338–1573).

Michael Sullivan

Additional Reading
Osvald Siren, Chinese Painting: Leading Masters and Principles, 7 vol. (1956–58, reissued 1974), is the standard history of Chinese painting. Ma Yuan's work is discussed in S. Shimada and Y. Yonezawa, Painting of Sung and Yuan Dynasties (1952); Kojiro Tomita, Portfolio of Chinese Paintings in the Museum: Han to Sung Periods, 2nd ed. (1938), from the collection of the Boston Museum of Fine Arts; Sherman E. Lee, Chinese Landscape Painting, 2nd rev. ed. (1962); Laurence Sickman (ed.), Chinese Calligraphy and Painting in the Collection of John M. Crawford, Jr. (1962); James Francis Cahill, Chinese Painting, XI–XIV Centuries (1960); and Michael Sullivan, A Short History of Chinese Art, rev. ed. (1967, reissued 1970). The little available evidence on his position at the Southern Sung court is discussed in Chiang Chao-shen, “The Identity of Yang Mei-tzu and the Paintings of Ma Yuan,” National Palace Museum Bulletin, 2(2):1–15 and 2(3):8–14 (1967).

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Universalium. 2010.

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