Koh-i-noor


Koh-i-noor
Famous Indian diamond with a history dating perhaps as far back as the 14th century.

Originally a 191-carat stone that lacked fire (flashes of colour), it was recut to 109 carats in 1852 in an attempt to enhance its fire and brilliance. The Koh-i-noor (Hindi for "mountain of light") was acquired by the British in 1849 and became part of the crown jewels of Queen Victoria. It was incorporated into the state crown fashioned for Queen Elizabeth, consort of George VI, at her coronation in 1937.

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also spelled  Kūh-e Nūr,  

      the diamond with the longest history for an extant stone, though its early history is controversial. Originally a lumpy Mughal-cut stone that lacked fire and weighed 191 carats, it was recut to enhance its fire and brilliance to a 109-carat, shallow, oval brilliant in 1852 at Garrards of London, with indifferent results.

      According to some experts, Sultan ʿAlāʾ-ud-Dīn Khaljī is credited with having taken the jewel in 1304 from the raja of Malwa, India, whose family had owned it for many generations. Other writers have identified the Koh-i-noor (meaning “mountain of light”) with the diamond given to the son of Bābur, the founder of the Mughal dynasty in India, by the raja of Gwalior after the battle of Panipat in 1526. Still others have contended that it came originally from the Kollur mine of the Krishna River and was presented to the Mughal emperor Shāh Jahān in 1656. Some claim that the stone was cut from the Great Mogul diamond described by the French jewel trader Jean-Baptiste Tavernier in 1665, but the Koh-i-noor's original lack of fire and shape make that unlikely.

      In any case, it most likely formed part of the loot of Nāder Shāh (Nādir Shāh) of Iran when he sacked Delhi in 1739. After his death it fell into the hands of his general, Aḥmad Shāh, founder of the Durrānī dynasty of Afghans. His descendant Shāh Shojāʿ, when a fugitive in India, was forced to surrender the stone to Ranjit Singh, the Sikh ruler. On the annexation of the Punjab in 1849, the Koh-i-noor was acquired by the British and was placed among the crown jewels of Queen Victoria. It was incorporated as the central stone in the queen's state crown fashioned for use by Queen Elizabeth, consort of George VI, at her coronation in 1937.

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Universalium. 2010.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Koh-i-noor — Kopie in der alten Form Koh i Noor Kopie in der neuen Form …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • Koh i noor — Kopie in der alten Form Koh i Noor Kopie in der neuen Form …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • Koh-i-Noor — Kopie in der alten Form …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • Koh-i-Noor — Koh i Nor Croquis du Koh i Noor d après Tavernier …   Wikipédia en Français

  • koh|i|noor — or Koh i noor «KOH uh nur», noun. a very large and famous Indian diamond (108.9 carats), that is now one of the British crown jewels. ╂[< Persian kōh i nūr (literally) mountain of light] koh|i|noor «KOH uh nur», noun. 1. any large and splendid …   Useful english dictionary

  • Koh|i|noor — or Koh i noor «KOH uh nur», noun. a very large and famous Indian diamond (108.9 carats), that is now one of the British crown jewels. ╂[< Persian kōh i nūr (literally) mountain of light] koh|i|noor «KOH uh nur», noun. 1. any large and splendid …   Useful english dictionary

  • Koh-i-noor — famous diamond, one of the British crown jewels after the annexation of Punjab in 1849, from Pers. koh i nur, lit. mountain of light, from Pers. koh mountain + Arabic nur light …   Etymology dictionary

  • Koh-i-noor — (spr. Kohinuhr), einer der größten Diamanten der Erde, jetzt im Besitz der Königin von England; s. Diamant f) …   Pierer's Universal-Lexikon

  • Koh-i-Noor — This article is about the diamond. For the film, see Kohinoor. For the Czech pencil manufacturer, see Koh I Noor (company). For the brush footed butterfly, see Amathuxidia amythaon.Infobox Diamond caption = Glass replica of the Koh I Noor as it… …   Wikipedia

  • Koh-i-Noor — Réplica en vidrio del Koh i Noor original en el museo Kunstareal en Múnich, Alemania …   Wikipedia Español


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