Jerusalem, Council of


Jerusalem, Council of
Conference of the Christian Apostles at Jerusalem с AD 50, which decreed that Gentile Christians did not have to observe the Mosaic law of the Jews.

It was occasioned by the controversy over whether circumcision was necessary for Gentile converts to Christianity. Led by Sts. Peter the Apostle and James, the council decided the issue in favor of St. Paul and the Gentile Christians, thus helping to separate early Christianity from Judaism.

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▪ Christian history
 a conference of the Christian Apostles in Jerusalem in about 50 CE that decreed that Gentile Christians did not have to observe the Mosaic Law of the Jews. It was occasioned by the insistence of certain Judaic Christians from Jerusalem that Gentile Christians from Antioch in Syria obey the Mosaic custom of circumcision. A delegation, led by the apostle Paul and his companion Barnabas, was appointed to confer with the elders of the church in Jerusalem.

      The ensuing apostolic conference (noted in Acts 15:2–35), led by the apostle Peter and James, “the Lord's brother,” decided the issue in favour of Paul and the Gentile Christians. From this time onward Gentile Christians were not bound by the Levitical ceremonial regulations of the Jews, except for the provisions of the so-called apostolic decree: abstention “from what has been sacrificed to idols and from blood and from what is strangled and from unchastity” (Acts 15:29). The Council of Jerusalem thus demonstrated the willingness of apostolic leaders to make compromises on certain secondary issues in order to maintain peace and unity in the church.

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Universalium. 2010.

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