Iturbide, Agustín de


Iturbide, Agustín de
or Agustín I

born Sept. 27, 1783, Valladolid, Viceroyalty of New Spain
died July 19, 1824, Padilla, Mex.

Leader of the conservative factions in the Mexican independence movement and, briefly, emperor of Mexico (1822–23).

An army officer when the independence movement emerged in 1810, he fought for the royalists, but in 1820, in reaction to a liberal coup in Spain, the conservatives did an about-face and advocated immediate independence. Iturbide joined forces with the insurgents and won Mexico's independence in 1821. In 1822 he crowned himself emperor, but his arbitrary and extravagant ways cost him support. His abdication in 1823 did not save him from execution. To Mexico's conservatives he remains the principal hero of Mexican independence.

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▪ emperor of Mexico
also called  (1822–23) Agustín I  
born Sept. 27, 1783, Valladolid, Viceroyalty of New Spain [now Morelia, Mex.]
died July 19, 1824, Padilla, Mex.

      Mexican caudillo (military chieftain) who became the leader of the conservative factions in the Mexican independence movement and, as Agustín I, briefly emperor of Mexico.

      Like many young men of the upper classes in Spanish America, Iturbide entered the royalist army, becoming an officer in the provincial regiment of his native city in 1797. In 1810 Miguel Hidalgo y Costilla (Hidalgo y Costilla, Miguel) offered him a post with his revolutionary army, but Iturbide refused and pledged himself to the Spanish cause instead. His defense of Valladolid against the revolutionary forces of José María Morelos (Morelos, José María) dealt a crushing blow to the insurgents, and for this victory Iturbide was given command of the military district of Guanajuato and Michoacán. In 1816, however, grave charges of extortion and violence caused his removal.

      By 1820 the radical independence movement was almost entirely extinguished. Both Hidalgo and Morelos had been captured and executed; only guerrilla bands (under the command of General Vicente Guerrero (Guerrero, Vicente)) prevented the complete victory of the royalists. The Mexican independence movement then performed a curious about-face. In reaction to a liberal coup d'état in Spain, the conservatives in Mexico (formerly staunch royalists) advocated immediate independence. Iturbide assumed command of the army and, at Iguala, allied his reactionary force with Guerrero's radical insurgents. Iturbide's Plan de Iguala (Iguala Plan), published on Feb. 24, 1821, proclaimed three guarantees: (1) immediate independence from Spain, (2) equality for Spaniards and Creoles, and (3) the supremacy of Roman Catholicism and a ban on all other religions. The Army of the Three Guarantees quickly subjugated the country; on Aug. 24, 1821, Juan O'Donojú, the new representative of the Spanish king, signed the Treaty of Córdoba, recognizing the independence of Mexico.

      The revolutionary coalition quickly fell apart as Iturbide removed Guerrero and his insurgent following from influence. On May 19, 1822, Iturbide placed the crown upon his own head and became Agustín I, emperor of Mexico. An arbitrary and extravagant ruler, he proved unable to bring order and stability to his country, and all parties soon turned against him. Opposition solidified behind Antonio López de Santa Anna (Santa Anna, Antonio López de), whose own plan called for Iturbide's overthrow and exile. On March 19, 1823, Iturbide abdicated and went first to Italy and then to England. In 1824, however, he returned to Mexico, unaware that the congress had decreed his death. Captured on July 15, he was executed four days later. Although regarded by most scholars as a self-serving military adventurer, he has remained for the Roman Catholic church and for the conservative classes the great hero of Mexican independence.

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Universalium. 2010.

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