Iran hostage crisis


Iran hostage crisis
(1979–81) Political crisis involving Iran's detention of U.S. diplomats.

Anti-American sentiment in Iran
fueled in part by close ties between the U.S. and the unpopular leader Mohammad Reza Shah Pahlavi
peaked when Pahlavi fled Iran during the 1979 Iranian revolution. When the monarch entered the U.S. for medical treatment later that year, Islamic militants stormed the U.S. embassy in Tehrān and seized 66 Americans. The hostage-takers, who enjoyed the tacit support of the new Iranian regime of Ruhollah Khomeini, demanded the shah's extradition to Iran, but Pres. Jimmy Carter refused and froze all Iranian assets in the U.S. The Iranians released 13 women and African Americans on Nov. 19–20, 1979, and another hostage was released in July 1980. A rescue attempt in April 1980 failed. Negotiations for the hostages' return began after the shah died in July 1980, but the remaining 52 hostages were kept in captivity until Jan. 20, 1981, when they were released moments after the inauguration of Ronald Reagan. The crisis contributed to Carter's failure to win reelection. See also Iran-Contra Affair.

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▪ United States history
Introduction

      international crisis (1979–81) in which militants in Iran seized 66 American citizens at the U.S. embassy in Tehrān, holding 52 of them hostage for more than a year. The crisis, which took place during the chaotic aftermath of Iran's Islamic revolution (1978–79) and its overthrow of the Pahlavi monarchy, had dramatic effects on domestic politics in the United States and poisoned U.S.-Iranian relations for decades.

The crisis
      Iran's revolution deeply altered that country's relationship with the United States. The deposed Iranian ruler, Mohammad Reza Shah Pahlavi, had been close to a succession of U.S. administrations, and this had produced deep suspicion and hostility among Iran's revolutionary leaders, from both the left and right of the political spectrum. Beginning in the fall of 1978, the U.S. embassy in Tehrān had been the scene of frequent demonstrations by Iranians who opposed the American presence in the country, and on February 14, 1979, about a month after the shah had fled Iran, the embassy was attacked and briefly occupied. The embassy weathered this assault, during which several of its personnel were killed or wounded, but Iran was in the throes of enormous revolutionary change, which called for a new U.S. posture in Iran. Consequently, by the start of the hostage crisis, the embassy staff had been cut from more than 1,400 men and women before the revolution to about 70. In addition, attempts had been made to arrive at a modus vivendi with Iran's provisional government, and during the spring and summer the Iranian authorities sought to strengthen security around the embassy complex.

      In October 1979 the U.S. State Department was informed that the deposed Iranian monarch required medical treatment that his aides claimed was available only in the United States; U.S. authorities, in turn, informed the Iranian prime minister, Mehdi Bazargan (Bazargan, Mehdi), of the shah's impending arrival on American soil. Bazargan, in light of the February attack, guaranteed the safety of the U.S. embassy and its staff. The shah arrived in New York City on October 22. The initial public response in Iran was moderate, but on November 4 the embassy was attacked by a mob of perhaps 3,000, some of whom were armed and who, after a short siege, took 63 American men and women hostage. (An additional three members of the U.S. diplomatic staff were actually seized at the Iranian Foreign Ministry.) Within the next few days, representatives of U.S. President Jimmy Carter (Carter, Jimmy) and Tehrān-based diplomats from other countries attempted but failed to free the hostages. An American delegation headed by former U.S. attorney general Ramsey Clark—who had long-standing relations with many Iranian officials—was refused admission to Iran.

 A political struggle was afoot in Tehrān—between the Islamic right and secular left and between various personalities within the Muslim coterie surrounding the revolutionary leader Ayatollah Ruhollah Khomeini (Khomeini, Ruhollah)—and the hostages apparently were caught in the stalemate resulting from this dispute. It soon became evident that no one within the virulently anti-American atmosphere of postrevolutionary Iran was willing, or able, to release the hostages. The hostage takers themselves most likely were supporters of Khomeini—whose failure to order the release of the hostages led Bazargan to resign the premiership on November 6—and demanded, as a condition of the hostages' release, that the United States extradite the shah to Iran.

      On November 12 acting Iranian foreign minister Abolhasan Bani-Sadr (Bani-Sadr, Abolhasan) indicated that the hostages would be released if the United States ceased interfering in Iranian affairs, if the shah was returned to Iran for trial, and if assets in the possession of the shah were declared stolen property. The United States responded by stating that Iran was free to make financial claims against the shah in U.S. courts and further declared that it would support establishing an international commission to investigate purported human rights abuses under the shah's regime; as a precondition of any such actions, however, the hostages would have to be returned.

      The United States bolstered its position by refusing to purchase Iranian oil, by freezing billions of dollars of Iranian assets in the United States, and by engaging throughout the crisis in a vigorous campaign of international diplomacy against the Iranians. U.S. diplomats twice obtained United Nations (UN) Security Council resolutions (on December 4 and 31) against Iran's actions, and on November 29 the United States filed suit against the Iranian government in the International Court of Justice (which ruled in favour of the United States in May 1980). The consensus of the international community was against the Iranian seizure of the hostages, and diplomats from various countries sought to intervene on their behalf. One notable incident occurred on January 28, 1980, when Canadian diplomats helped six American diplomats who had managed to avoid capture flee Iran (the Canadian embassy was subsequently closed).

      Earlier, on November 17, Khomeini had ordered the release of 13 hostages, all women or African Americans, on the grounds that they were unlikely to be spies (another hostage, who became gravely ill, was released on July 11, 1980, producing the final number of 52 hostages). Throughout the ordeal the Iranians used as negotiating leverage the threat of putting the hostages on trial for various crimes, including espionage.

Conflict and resolution
      Almost from the beginning of the crisis, U.S. military forces started formulating plans to recover the hostages, and by early April 1980 the U.S. administration, still unable to find anyone to negotiate with in a meaningful fashion, was seeking a military option. Despite political turbulence in Iran, the hostages were still being held by their original captors in the embassy complex. On April 24 a small U.S. task force landed in the desert southeast of Tehrān. From that staging point, a group of special operations soldiers was to advance via helicopter to a second rally point, stage a quick raid of the embassy compound, and convey the hostages to an airstrip that was to be secured beforehand by a second team of soldiers, who were to fly there directly from outside Iran. The soldiers and hostages would then withdraw by air. However, the operation was fraught with problems from the beginning. Two of the eight helicopters sent for the operation malfunctioned before arriving at the first staging area, and another broke down on the site. Unable to complete their mission, U.S. forces sought to withdraw, during which one of the remaining helicopters collided with a support aircraft. Eight U.S. service members were killed, and their bodies, left behind, were later paraded before Iranian television cameras. The Carter administration, humiliated by the failed mission and loss of life, expended great energy to have the bodies returned to the United States. Secretary of State Cyrus Vance (Vance, Cyrus), who had opposed the mission, resigned in protest. All diplomatic initiatives in the hostage crisis came to a standstill, and the hostages were placed, incommunicado, in new, concealed locations.

      By May 1980 the United States had convinced its closest allies to institute an economic embargo against Iran. However, the embargo alone was not enough to weaken Iranian resolve; nor, for that matter, did the shah's death on July 27 break the dilemma. Two subsequent events, however, made a resolution of the crisis seem more likely. First, in mid-August Iran finally installed a new government, and the Carter administration immediately sought to extend diplomatic overtures. Second, on September 22 Iraq invaded Iran. Although the subsequent Iran-Iraq War (1980–88) distracted Iranian officials from hostage negotiations in the short term, the embargo continued to wear away at the Iranian economy and the country's ability to stave off Iraqi forces. Likewise, when Iranian Prime Minister Mohammad Ali Rajaʾi (Rajaʾi, Mohammad Ali) visited the UN in October, numerous world leaders made it clear to him that Iran could not expect support in the Iraq conflict as long as it held the U.S. hostages.

      As a consequence, Iranian officials engaged in negotiations with renewed vigour. Rajaʾi insisted that there be no direct negotiations, however, and Algerian diplomats acted as middlemen throughout the remainder of the process. Negotiations continued throughout late 1980 and early 1981, during which time the Iranian demands centred largely on releasing frozen Iranian assets and lifting the trade embargo. An agreement having been made, the hostages were released on January 20, 1981, minutes after the inauguration of the new U.S. president, Ronald W. Reagan (Reagan, Ronald W.).

The aftermath
      The Iran hostage crisis was a severe blow to U.S. morale and prestige, coming as it did in the aftermath of the Vietnam War. In addition to placing a roadblock in the path of U.S.-Iranian relations, it was also widely believed to have contributed to Carter's defeat by Reagan in the 1980 presidential election. Moreover, in the years following the crisis, allegations arose that the Reagan campaign had acted to hinder Carter's attempts to negotiate an earlier settlement—thus derailing a possible electoral coup for the Carter campaign—in an effort to ensure a Reagan victory. However, that contention has been largely dismissed.

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Universalium. 2010.

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