High Commission, Court of


High Commission, Court of
English ecclesiastical court instituted by Henry VIII to enforce the Act of Supremacy (1534).

It became a controversial instrument of repression, used against those who refused to acknowledge the authority of the Church of England. Its main function, and the most controversial, was administration of the oath ex officio, committing one to answer even self-incriminating questions; those who refused to take the oath were turned over to the feared Court of Star Chamber. Opposition, mainly from the Puritans and the common lawyers, resulted in the court's abolishment by Parliament in 1641. See also prerogative court.

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▪ English ecclesiastical court
      English ecclesiastical court instituted by the crown in the 16th century as a means to enforce the laws of the Reformation settlement and exercise control over the church. In its time it became a controversial instrument of repression, used against those who refused to acknowledge the authority of the Church of England.

      The Act of Supremacy (1534) recognized Henry VIII as supreme head of the Church of England and assigned to the crown the power to visit, investigate, correct, and discipline the regular and secular clergy. This act was given practical effect in 1535 when Thomas Cromwell was appointed viceregent, invested with royal authority in ecclesiastical affairs, and directed to delegate part of it to such persons as he thought fit. The first general commission was held under Edward VI in 1549.

      Until 1565 the commissioners' work was mainly visitational and their authority temporary. But the continued difficulties in enforcing the settlement and the increasing amount of ecclesiastical business delegated to it by the privy council transformed a temporary device into a permanent, regularized prerogative court. These developments were reflected in the appearance of the term “high commission” by 1570, and the title of “court” about 10 years later. In the face of growing opposition to the established church from Roman Catholics and Puritans alike, an increasing burden was placed upon the commissioners.

      The total membership of the commission, varying between 24 in 1549 and 108 in 1633, consisted mainly of canon lawyers, bishops, and important laymen. Its jurisdiction in relationship to other ecclesiastical courts was both concurrent and appellate. It could assume only certain types of jurisdiction in criminal matters and could not initiate cases between two parties, although it had appellate jurisdiction in this area. Its procedure was normally based on the administration of the oath ex officio, the most controversial instrument of the court. Those who refused to take the oath were turned over to the much-feared Court of Star Chamber. Those who submitted were forced to answer all questions put to them, thereby being compelled to choose between committing perjury or providing the grounds for their own conviction. This procedure had been adopted from the church courts, but here the penalties were generally secular: fine or imprisonment. The commission did not employ torture or inflict the death penalty.

      The opposition that eventually destroyed the commission came principally from the Puritans, the common lawyers, and the common-law judges. The Puritans resented the commission's enforcement of certain services they regarded as idolatrous and the use of the ex officio oath. The common lawyers' opposition stemmed from the traditional hostility between lay and church courts.

      In 1641, when Charles I had to give way to Parliament, the court was abolished. The court was briefly revived in 1686 by James II, only to be finally condemned by the Bill of Rights in 1689 as “illegal and pernicious.” See also prerogative court.

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Universalium. 2010.

Look at other dictionaries:

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