Guinea, Gulf of


Guinea, Gulf of
Great inlet of the Atlantic Ocean, western Central African coast.

It includes the Bights of Benin and Biafra, and its major tributaries are the Casamance, Volta, and Niger rivers. Its natural resources include offshore oil deposits and metal ore deposits. Its coastline forms part of the western edge of the African tectonic plate and corresponds remarkably to the continental margin of South America from Brazil to the Guianas, providing one of the clearest confirmations of the theory of continental drift.

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      part of the eastern tropical Atlantic Ocean off the western African (Western Africa) coast, extending westward from Cap López, near the Equator, to Cape Palmas at longitude 7° west. Its major tributaries include the Volta and Niger rivers.

      The coastline of the Gulf of Guinea forms part of the western edge of the African tectonic plate and corresponds remarkably to the continental margin of South America running from Brazil to the Guianas. The coincidence between the geology and the geomorphology of these two coastlines constitutes one of the clearest confirmations of the theory of continental drift.

      The continental shelf of the Gulf of Guinea is almost uniformly narrow and widens to as much as 100 miles (160 km) only from Sierra Leone to the Bijagós Archipelago, Guinea-Bissau, and in the Bight of Biafra. The Niger River has built a great delta of Holocene muds (i.e., those less than 12,000 years old)—and it is only here that the fit between the African and South American tectonic plates is seriously disturbed.

      The only active volcanic region is the island arc aligned with Mount Cameroon (Cameroon, Mount) (13,353 feet [4,070 m]) on the coast of the Cameroon Republic; the islands of this arc (Bioko [Fernando Po], Príncipe, São Tomé, and Annobón) extend 450 miles (724 km) offshore to the southwest.

      The entire northern coast of the gulf is washed by the eastward flow of the Guinea Current, which extends 250–300 miles (400–480 km) offshore from Senegal to the Bight of Biafra. The gulf's tropical water is separated from the Equator-ward flow of the cool Benguela (Benguela Current) and Canary currents by sharp frontal regions off the Congo and Senegal rivers, respectively. The Benguela Current, as it swings westward, forms the South Equatorial Current to the south of, and running counter to, the Guinea Current.

      The warm tropical water of the Gulf of Guinea is of relatively low salinity because of river effluents and high rainfall along the coast. This warm water is separated from deeper, more-saline, and colder water by a shallow thermocline—a layer of water between upper and lower levels that lies usually less than 100 feet (30 m) deep. Coastal upwelling, and hence a rich production of plant and animal life, occurs seasonally and locally off Senegal and the Congo and off the central gulf coasts of Ghana and Côte d'Ivoire.

      The variety of the marine flora and fauna of the Gulf of Guinea is limited when compared with that of the western tropical Atlantic and, especially, with the Indo-Pacific biogeographic realm. This relative biological poverty results from (1) a lack of coral-reef ecosystems because of low salinity and the high turbidity of Guinea Current water and (2) the climatic regression to cool conditions during the Miocene epoch (i.e., some 25 million to 5 million years ago), during which far fewer refuges for tropical species of animals and plants were available in the Atlantic than in the Indo-Pacific region.

      Because most of the coast is low-lying, without natural harbours, and largely separated from the dry land of the interior by a belt of muddy mangrove-infested creeks and lagoons, the African coastal peoples have usually not taken easily to seafaring on the gulf. Groups located in Senegal and Ghana, where the coast is less irregular and coastal fisheries are relatively productive, form an exception. The gulf's natural resources include offshore oil deposits and deposits of hard minerals within the continental shelf.

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Universalium. 2010.

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