Georgian style


Georgian style
Architecture, interior design, and decorative arts of Britain during the reigns (1714–1830) of the first four Georges.

It encompassed Palladianism (see Andrea Palladio), turned to an austere Neoclassicism, moved on to Gothic Revival, and ended with the Regency style. The era is said to mark the summit of house design in Britain. Its legacy can be seen in the city squares of uniform, symmetrical brick London townhouses, their facades employing Classical pilasters, pedimented doors and windows, and graceful moldings. Their interiors, often furnished with Chippendale and Sheraton pieces, were characterized by harmonious proportions, quiet colors, and Roman-derived stucco ornamentation.

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 the various styles in the architecture (Western architecture), interior design, and decorative arts of Britain during the reigns of the first four members of the house of Hanover, between the accession of George I in 1714 and the death of George IV in 1830. There was such diversification and oscillation in artistic style during this period that it is perhaps more accurate to speak of “Georgian styles.”

      For the first 50 years of the Hanoverian dynasty the same Whig aristocracy that controlled the government also dictated artistic thought. The splendid architectural achievements of Sir Christopher Wren and his followers during the reigns of the three preceding Stuart (Stuart style) monarchs were in the extravagant and monumental Baroque style of continental Europe, which the Whig aristocrats eventually judged to be of questionable taste. Thus, the new generation of architects, theorists, and wealthy amateurs set out to reform architecture in accordance with the classical tenets of the Italian architect Andrea Palladio (see Palladianism). The second important Georgian architectural style, Neoclassicism, came into fashion about the mid-18th century. The models for the architecture of this period were no longer the buildings of the Italian Renaissance but those of Classical Greece and Rome. Neoclassicism's austere use of Doric and Ionic architectural elements increasingly dominated English architecture in the late 18th century. Toward the end of the century and during the reign of George IV, a number of other styles of building and interior decoration became popular, chief among them Gothic Revival and the Regency style (q.v.).

      In addition to architecture and interior design, the Georgian era saw great achievements in the decorative arts. Technical as well as aesthetic advances were made in pottery by Josiah Wedgwood and Josiah Spode. Paul de Lamerie (Lamerie, Paul de), working primarily in the Rococo style, was preeminent among English silversmiths of the early to mid-18th century, after which the Neoclassical designs of the Adam family dominated this craft. Furniture design encompassed a variety of distinct and memorable styles, ranging from the complicated curves of pieces by Thomas Chippendale (mid-18th century), to the classical influence of the Adams, to the straight, simple lines of the works of George Hepplewhite and Thomas Sheraton. It was also during the Georgian era that wallpaper came to supplant wood paneling as the preferred method of covering interior walls.

      The Georgian era is notably remembered as marking the summit of house design in Britain. Its legacy can be seen in the entire city squares of uniform, symmetrical townhouses in London, their facades employing classical pilasters, pedimented doors and windows, and graceful moldings. These houses' interiors—with harmonious proportions, quiet colours, Roman-derived stucco ornamentation, and Chippendale and Sheraton furniture—once made elegant settings for the paintings of Reynolds and Gainsborough that adorned the walls.

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Universalium. 2010.

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