Genroku period


Genroku period
(1688–1704) Period in Japanese history characterized by a flourishing of the culture of the non-samurai city dweller.

The term is often used to cover a longer cultural period (с 1675–1725). Ostentatious displays of wealth were prohibited, but the affluent townspeople of Kyōto, Ōsaka, and Edo (Tokyo) found means to display their wealth. Much time and money was spent in the pleasure quarters, districts where theatres, brothels, and teahouses were located, and this "floating (i.e., fleeting) world," or ukiyo, was commemorated in brightly colored woodblock prints (see ukiyo-e). The Genroku period set the standards for an urban culture that continued throughout the Edo period. See also Edo culture.

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▪ Japanese history
      in Japanese history, era from 1688 to 1704, characterized by a rapidly expanding commercial economy and the development of a vibrant urban culture centred in the cities of Kyōto, Ōsaka, and Edo (Tokyo). The growth of the cities was a natural outcome of a century of peaceful Tokugawa rule and its policies designed to concentrate samurai in castle towns. Whereas Edo became the administrative capital of the Tokugawa shogunate, Ōsaka served as the country's commercial hub, and rich Ōsaka merchants generally were the ones who defined Genroku culture. Free of the rigid codes that restricted samurai, townsmen could spend their leisure in the pursuit of pleasure, while their profits created a cultural explosion. The bunraku puppet theatre and kabuki developed into a high dramatic art with the works of the playwrights Chikamatsu Monzaemon and Takeda Izumo. The stories of Ihara Saikaku humorously depicted urban life, while haiku poetry was perfected by Matsuo Bashō. In art the wood-block prints (ukiyo-e) of Hishikawa Moronobu rank among the earliest masterpieces. Other notable pieces of wood-block art, including those of Suzuki Harunobu, who developed the multicolour technique, soon followed. The Genroku period set the standards for an urban culture that continued to flourish throughout the Tokugawa period.

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Universalium. 2010.

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