French language


French language
Romance language spoken as a first language by about 72 million people in France, Belgium, Switzerland, Canada (mainly Quebec), and many other countries and regions formerly governed by France.

French is an official language of more than 25 countries. Its earliest written materials date from the 9th century. Numerous regional dialects were eventually pushed aside by Francien, the dialect of Paris, adopted as the standard language in the mid-16th century. This largely replaced the dialects of northern and central France, known as the langue d'oïl (from oïl, the northern word for "yes"), and greatly reduced the use of the Occitan language of southern France, known as langue d'oc (from oc, Occitan for "yes"). Regional dialects survive mostly in uneducated rural speech. French grammar has been greatly simplified from Latin. Nouns do not have cases, and masculine and feminine gender are marked not in the noun but in its article or adjective. The verb is conjugated for three persons and for singular and plural; though spelled differently, several of these forms are pronounced identically.

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French  Français,  

      Romance language spoken in France, Belgium, and Switzerland; in Canada (principally Quebec) and northern New England; and in many other countries and regions formerly or currently governed by France. It is an official language of more than 25 countries. Written materials in French date from the Strasbourg Oaths of 842.

      The standard for French is based on the dialect of Paris, called Francien (Francien dialect), which has been the official standard language since the mid-16th century. Francien has largely replaced other regional dialects of French spoken in northern and central France; these dialects made up the so-called langue d 'oïl (the term is based on the French use of the word oïl, modern oui, for “yes”). Standard French has also greatly reduced the use of the Occitan language (q.v.) of southern France (the so-called langue d'oc, from Provençal oc for “yes”). Occitan's major dialect, Provençal, was a widely used medieval literary language. Regional dialects of French survive for the most part only in uneducated rural speech, although the Picard–Walloon dialect of northern France and the Norman dialect of western France gave strong competition to Francien in medieval times, and Walloon is still spoken in Belgium. Other dialects are Orléanais, Bourbonnais, Champenois, Lorrain, Bourguignon, Franc-Comtois, Gallo, Angevin, Maine, Poitevin, Saintongeais, and Angoumois.

      French phonology is characterized by great changes in the sounds of words as compared to their Latin parent forms as well as to cognates in the other Romance languages. For example, Latin secūrum “sure, secure” became Spanish seguro but French sûr; Latin vōcem “voice” became Spanish voz but French voix, pronounced vwa.

      French grammar, like that of the other Romance languages, has been greatly simplified from that of Latin (Latin language). Nouns are not declined for case. Formerly, they were marked for plural by the addition of -s or -es, but the ending, though retained in spelling, has generally been lost in speech. Masculine and feminine gender are distinguished but are usually marked not in the noun but rather in the accompanying article or adjective. Plural marking in spoken French is often similarly distinguished. The verb in French is conjugated for three persons, singular and plural, but again, although distinguished in spelling, several of these forms are pronounced identically. French has verb forms for indicative, imperative, and subjunctive moods; preterite, imperfect, present, future, and conditional, and a variety of perfect and progressive tenses; and passive and reflexive constructions.

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Universalium. 2010.

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