Frank, Jacob


Frank, Jacob
orig. Jacob Leibowicz

born 1726, Berezanka or Korolowka, Galicia, Pol.
died Dec. 10, 1791, Offenbach, Hessen

Jewish false messiah.

He was an uneducated visionary who claimed to be the reincarnation of Shabbetai Tzevi. He proclaimed himself messiah in 1751 and founded the Frankist, or Zoharist, sect, based on the Sefer ha-zohar, which he sought to put in the place of the Torah. The sect rejected traditional Judaism, and their practices, including orgiastic rites, led the Jewish community to excommunicate them in 1756. Protected by Roman Catholic authorities, who hoped Frank would help in the conversion of the Jews, Frank and his followers were baptized in Poland. In 1760 he was imprisoned by the Inquisition, who had realized that Frank's followers regarded Frank, not Jesus, as the messiah. Freed in 1773 by invading Russians, he settled in Germany and lived as a baron until his death.

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▪ Polish religious leader
original name  Jacob Leibowicz  
born 1726, in Berezanka or Korolowka, Galicia, Pol. [now in Ukraine]
died Dec. 10, 1791, Offenbach, Hessen [Germany]

      Jewish false messiah who claimed to be the reincarnation of Shabbetai Tzevi (1626–76). The most notorious of the false messiahs, he was the founder of the antirabbinical Frankist, or Zoharist, sect.

      Frank often traveled in the Balkans and there met followers of Shabbetai. An uneducated visionary, he appealed to many who awaited the resurrection of Shabbetai. In about 1751 he proclaimed himself the messiah and four years later, in Poland, formed a sect that held that certain elect persons are exempt from the moral law. This sect abandoned Judaism for a “higher Torah” (Jewish Law) based on the Zohar (Sefer ha-zohar), which was the most important work in the Kabbala, the Jewish mystical movement. Hence its members also called themselves Zoharists. Their practices, including orgiastic, sexually promiscuous rites, led the Jewish community to ban them as heretics in 1756. Protected by Roman Catholic authorities, who saw in them a means of converting the Jews, the Frankists debated with representatives of the rabbinate and claimed that the Talmud (Talmud and Midrash), the rabbinical compendium of law and commentary, should be discarded as blasphemous. They were also partly responsible for the revival of the canard that the Jews use Christian blood for Passover rituals.

      In the meantime, to preserve his following, Frank publicly committed his supporters to mass baptism and was himself baptized in Warsaw, with Augustus III, king of Poland, acting as his godfather. The Frankists, however, continued their sectarian ways. As a result, the Inquisition imprisoned Frank in the fortress of Częstochowa (1760).

      Freed by the conquering Russians in 1773, he eventually settled in Offenbach, dubbing himself baron. His many followers supported him in a manner befitting the nobility. Upon Frank's death, he was succeeded by his daughter Eve, who eventually spent all the money that the Frankists had given her, leading to her arrest for bankruptcy. She died in 1816. The sect deteriorated rapidly, and descendants of those members who were baptized merged with the Roman Catholic population.

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Universalium. 2010.

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