Egyptian law


Egyptian law
Law that prevailed in Egypt from с 3000 BC to с 30 BC.

No formal Egyptian code of law has been preserved, but legal documents (e.g., deeds and contracts) have survived. The pharaoh was the ultimate authority in the settlement of disputes. The next most powerful individual was the vizier, who directed all administrative branches of the government, sat in judgment on court cases, and appointed magistrates. Parties to a dispute were not represented by legal advocates; they spoke for themselves, presented any documentary evidence, and sometimes called witnesses. Both men and women could own and bequeath property, file lawsuits, and bear witness. Punishment for criminal offenders could be severe, but in some periods basic human rights, even those of slaves, were acknowledged. Egyptian law strongly influenced both Greek and Roman law.

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      the law that originated with the unification of Upper and Lower Egypt under King Menes (c. 2925 BC) and grew and developed until the Roman occupation of Egypt (30 BC). The history of Egyptian law is longer than that of any other civilization. Even after the Roman occupation, elements of Egyptian law were retained outside the major urban areas.

      No formal Egyptian code of law has been preserved, although several pharaohs (pharaoh), such as Bocchoris (c. 722–c. 715 BC), were known as lawgivers. After the 7th century BC, however, when the Demotic language (the popular form of the written language) came into use, many legal transactions required written deeds or contracts instead of the traditional oral agreement; and these extant documents have been studied for what they reveal of the law of ancient Egypt.

      The ultimate authority in the settlement of disputes was the pharaoh, whose decrees were supreme. Because of the complex nature of legal administration, the pharaoh delegated powers to provincial governors and other officials. Next to the pharaoh, the most powerful individual was the vizier, who directed all administrative branches of the government. He sat in judgment on court cases and appointed magistrates as part of his legal duties.

      In a legal proceeding (procedural law), the plaintiff was required to bring suit. The tribunal then ordered the defendant to appear in court if a point of law seemed to be involved in the dispute. Scribes employed in the legal system supplied procedural information; the parties were not represented by legal advocates. Both parties spoke for themselves and presented any pertinent documentary evidence. Witnesses sometimes were called, but usually the judge ruled on the grounds of the documents and the testimony of each party. The judgment included recommendations for preserving the written record of the trial—possibly the main reason why many of these documents are extant.

      Although masculine primogeniture (primogeniture and ultimogeniture) dominated in some periods of Egyptian history, there are records of property (property law) being divided equally among the children, male and female. Even with masculine primogeniture, the other children and the surviving spouse usually received a share of the estate. The usual law of succession could be circumvented by a special enregistered document: a parent, for example, could favour a daughter by guaranteeing her rights over the family property. Legal judgments pertaining to the family and rights of succession clearly demonstrate that women as well as men were granted full rights under the laws of ancient Egypt. Women owned and bequeathed property, filed lawsuits, and bore witness in court proceedings without the authority of their father or husband. The working class also had some legal rights; even slaves were allowed to own property under certain circumstances.

      Property transfers and contractual (contract) agreements were conducted as if they were the same type of legal transaction. Rental of slaves, for example, was regarded as a sales agreement. Work was often bartered for various commodities. The individual parties were allowed to determine restrictions and guarantees in their transaction concerning possible defects in the property or service as well as defects in the law.

      Criminal (criminal law) justice necessitated a hierarchy in the judicial system, depending on the severity of the charge. The most heinous criminals could be judged only by the pharaoh, often with the vizier conducting the investigation and turning to the pharaoh for final judgment. In some cases, the pharaoh appointed a special commission with full authority to pass judgment. Punishment for serious crimes included penal servitude and execution; mutilation and flogging were often used to punish lesser offenders.

      Although punishment for criminal offenders could be severe—and, in the modern viewpoint, barbaric—Egyptian law nevertheless was admirable in its support of basic human rights. The pharaoh Bocchoris, for example, promoted individual rights, suppressed imprisonment for debt, and reformed laws relating to the transferral of property. His legal innovations are one example of the far-reaching implications of Egyptian law: the Greek lawgiver Solon (6th century BC) visited Egypt and adapted aspects of the legal system to his own ideas for Athens. Egyptian law continued to influence Greek law during the Hellenistic period, and its effects on Roman imperial law may still be felt today.

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Universalium. 2010.

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