Eastern Indian bronze


Eastern Indian bronze
or Pala bronze

Metal sculptures produced from the 9th century in the area of modern Bihar and West Bengal in India, extending into Bangladesh.

Made of an alloy of eight metals and produced by lost-wax casting, they represent various divinities (e.g., Shiva, Vishnu) and are small and portable. Produced in the great Buddhist monasteries and distributed throughout South Asia, they influenced the art of Burma (Myanmar), Siam (Thailand), and Java.

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▪ Indian art
also called  Pāla Bronze,  
 any of a style of metal sculptures produced from the 9th century onward in the area of modern Bihār and West Bengal in India, extending into Bangladesh. They are sometimes referred to as Pāla bronzes, after the name of one of the reigning dynasties (Pāla and Sena, 8th–12th century AD). The principal centres of production were the great Buddhist monasteries at Nālandā (near modern Patna) and Kurkihar (near Bodh Gayā). Images were distributed throughout Southeast Asia, so that the style influenced Myanmar (Burma), Siam (modern Thailand), and Java. Its impact on the Buddhist art of Kashmir, Nepal, and Tibet also is clearly recognized.

      The bronzes, strictly speaking, consisted of an alloy of eight metals and were cast by the lost-wax process. They represent the various divinities of later Buddhism (especially Śiva and Vishnu) and, being mainly small and portable in size, were intended for private worship. In style the metal images largely continued the Gupta tradition of Sārnāth but endowed it with a certain heavy sensuousness. They differ little stylistically from contemporary stone sculptures of the region but surpass them in the precise definition of ornamental detail and in a certain elegant virtuosity.

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Universalium. 2010.

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