Declaratory Act


Declaratory Act
(1766) Declaration by the British Parliament that accompanied repeal of the Stamp Act.

It stated that Parliament's authority was the same in America as in Britain and asserted Parliament's authority to make laws binding on the American colonies.

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Great Britain [1766]
      (1766), declaration by the British Parliament that accompanied the repeal of the Stamp Act. It stated that the British Parliament's taxing authority was the same in America as in Great Britain. Parliament had directly taxed the colonies for revenue in the Sugar Act (1764) and the Stamp Act (1765). Parliament mollified the recalcitrant colonists by repealing the distasteful Stamp Act, but it actually hardened its principle in the Declaratory Act by asserting its complete authority to make binding laws on the American colonies “in all cases whatsoever.” This crisis focused attention on the unresolved question of Parliament's relationship to a growing empire. The act particularly illustrated British insensitivity to the political maturity that had developed in the American provinces during the 18th century. Parliamentary suspension of the New York Assembly (1767) increased colonial alarm, and each new regulatory act added to the colonists' fear of the parliamentary threat to well-established colonial institutions of self-government.

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Universalium. 2010.